5

I'd say insanely difficult, if not impossible. You're going to have huge issues if the music is audible while the person is speaking. If that's the case, you're going to need something that can separate out elements of a complex signal. The only thing I can think of that might be able to pull that off is Melodyne...but I'm not sure even that will work. Is ...


3

The link here is not specifically about sound design in film but about how sounds get patented and are linked to certain products. I found it very interesting as to how a sound can remind us of something or make us do or buy something. I thought you might enjoy it. A neurological sonic trip. http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-sizzle/


3

Do you have a field recording kit, or some sort of field recorder? You could loop the interview somewhere (preferably quiet) outside. It will probably match production better than a super clean studio recording anyway. I wouldn't try this in a live, non-treated room. The human ear is super sensitive to early reflections, and it will be pretty obvious that ...


3

Yes, generally a very large percentage of audio in nature docs is recorded in post. Back in January I posted a TVB Europe magazine article on my blog that deals with exactly that subject.


3

I know some people who work in that arena and from the stories I've been told that it's a frighteningly large amount... or more than the suits would like us admitting to. I'd say at least 75% in most situations.


3

Plus one for Touch the Sound. There's a great old newsreel called "Back of the Mike" which shows a radio play performance in action, complete with live sound effects performance. You can watch it here. I also dig "Fog City Mavericks" a documentary about Bay Area Filmmakers (Coppola, Lucas etc.) and how they influenced the cinema world, including film sound....


2

Touch the Sound. It's a documentary about Evelyn Glennie, a deaf percussionist (and an amazing one at that). The first 17=20 minutes is primarily sound montage...there's some dialog in that stretch, but it's very sparse. It's a must watch for any sound editor/designer/mixer, in my humble opinion.


2

I realize this is an old thread, but iZotope RX3 does a great job of this if the music is in stereo. What you can do is use the Center Channel Extractor in RX3, and it will use phase cancellation to isolate the mono dialogue from the stereo music. I work in a trailer house where we frequently need to clean up bites from movies with bad stems.


2

I would say removing the music is impossible. Phase cancellation won't work unfortunately, the signals need to be mathematically identical for this to work, and if anything is off by a mm or if someone is not in the room you won't achieve this and (as Marco Lopez said) end up with high frequency residual at best, or mutilated dialogue and no cancellation at ...


1

Yes you should always use the boom as well as a lav, as the lav mic could sound crappy and if that's all you have then you're screwed. It could fall off, scratch against clothes, get wind noise, lots of things, but if you have a boom over the top then you're covered.


1

The h4n has two inputs, so recording these separately should be simple, which I very much recommend doing.


1

There are a number of techniques and mics that can be used. Spaced omnis, reflectors, hydrophones, contact mics, soundfield mics to name a few are used to capture individual calls and ambiences. The Natural History Unit used to have a sound department until 2001 for capturing location sound but alas these days most of it seems to be stock sound, Foley or ...


1

Hey Jan, Depending on what the actors are wearing, you might consider hiding a lavalier mic in plain sight on each actor's body. There are some awesome techniques for doing this, like the PEN CAP TRICK (starts at 3:28), replacing a button or other part of the garment with the mic, or using something like the RODE PINMIC on a similarly-colored garment. All ...


1

What about the film Blow out. Havent actually watched it yet but the main character is a sound recordist who accidently records the sound of a murder! chilling stuff...


1

Soundtracker - A Portrait Of Gordon Hempton [youtube]ROWl0eh9BLo[/youtube] The guy is a legend!


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Hands down "Modern Romance" The famous "space floor" scene - http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4531705519963169998


1

Hey guys, So here I am 6 months later. I didn't realize at the time that I had not been logged in under my account when I asked this question. So I hadn't received any email updates on this topic. So here is what I learned from this experience: What ended up happening: I had gone along as the sound effects editor, reviewing the OMF tracks to see what ...


1

If the dialogue is edited and all there and he thinks the responsibility isn't his for the verite tracks, you'll be the one who is hit for it. The audience only ever hears the final soundtrack - there are no notes about this type of thing in the credits: "Dialogue editor screwed over Sound Effects editor so there were no sound effects in some places". I ...


1

hmm, the dialogue editor didn't split out the sync sound effects to different tracks of the session? this is, in my humble opinion, what he should have done. (sorry for being captain hindsight). the advice: if you really haven't slept in days, take your responsibility and take a rest/break. nothing is more important than your health. let the team know about ...


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