6

I tend to go manual. When I'm editing VO, its just a matter of a fast breath cutting pass and then a separate pass of other editorial and mixing. For breath cutting, I'll make the waveform and the track very big so that I'm just looking at the softer stuff in the track (not worried about seeing peaks when breath editing) then i'll place my left hand on the ...


6

There are two main elements to this answer- 1) Room- This is VERY important. I recorded an actor screaming (should've brought my earplugs!) in a wardrobe room. The room was small but not too small and the hanging clothes worked pretty well for difusion. We checked out a few different rooms and found this one to be the best. Not too dead and not too ...


4

I usually have my Dial editors only do very basic level adjustments. Basically lower any really loud pfx or a line that is dramatically out of sorts with the rest of the scene. With noise reduction, I never want my editor to do any broadband NR or notch filtering. You can get into a lot of unnecessary processing that might not be needed once everything ...


4

It depends on the agreements made between the dialogue editor/supervisor and the sound supervisor. Mixers could prefer to not have volume automation, but this differs. Why do you ask? Are you editing dialogue? Or are you mixing the movie? Recommended reading: Dialogue-Editing-Motion-Pictures


3

A show usually has a leader reference tone and also has pops, known as sync pops or head pops (versus tail pops) or casually just called "2 pop". The reference tone is in regard to calibration level, the 2 pop is (secondarily for calibration) but primarily for ensuring sync - especially when we';re talking about ProTools sessions containing the ...


3

Well, isn't this a case of mainly matching the convention? If it's established, then it's effective, even if it has no rational reason. When you think of it, another way to convey past would be some sounds or music that are recognized as belonging to a certain time period (that's in the past. It can be even the film's past, i.e. the reference is made to an ...


3

I took a look through Ableton and it is possible, though potentially more time-consuming depending upon how you have your session set up. If your edits are clean and each "ooh", "aah", etc. is its own separate region, bring all of the regions into the "session" view as clips. Make sure they are edited with proper start/end times using the start/stop ...


3

As everyone else has said, noise reduction is the way to go, pretty aggressive noise reduction is all that will help I think. Thing is, if you want this conversation for sound bites or anything, it's probably going to be unusable. You may be able to pull enough of the noise out so that the vocals become just audible, but they're likely to sound watery and ...


2

I realize this is an old thread, but iZotope RX3 does a great job of this if the music is in stereo. What you can do is use the Center Channel Extractor in RX3, and it will use phase cancellation to isolate the mono dialogue from the stereo music. I work in a trailer house where we frequently need to clean up bites from movies with bad stems.


2

Have you already worked with the usual suspects? convolving or vocoding some of the voice with some rock debris? I have these heavy cast iron dutch ovens that when you turn the lid sounds like an ancient stone door, a layer like that may help. I would probably do some dirt and debris drops when there is a break in the speaking. Please post when finished! ...


2

Here's an idea - if you've got some rock movement noises to mix in with the vocal, you can use an envelope follower on the voice to control the volume of the extra sounds you want to add in. This idea could also be expanded so rock sounds to adapt with the voice; chop the vocal into vowels and consonants, lay them on different tracks and have the envelope of ...


2

Oh man, bad move on the sound recordists part and even worse move from the producer to use those sections! Obviously not your fault at all so I'd say explain the situation to the director/producer and let them decide what they want to do


2

How long of content are you working on? I usually just cut most breaths out during rough playback and fine tune any edits while clients are discussing other stuff. I would personally rather spend my time cleaning up the read at its source rather than tweaking gates/ expanders etc to guess whats happening. Every talent is different also, some have huge ...


2

Several things a dialog editor can and should do with level automation... smooth out transitions between handles on different takes keep dialog levels roughly consistent between takes reduce loud momentary sounds gently reduce annoyingly loud constant background sounds around dialog, but not during it I don't discourage editors from using something like ...


2

Figured out a solution to this, can't believe it didn't hit me before: 1. Mix and edit the sounds with processing on individual channels, and master channel if necessary 2. Render the entire sequence, taking the output from the master channel. 3. Add this rendered file back into the set on a new audio channel. Right click this audio clip and choose 'Crop ...


2

There are plug-ins that handle this for you (DUY Magic Spectrum...though Zynaptiq's Unfilter can do a decent job of it as well). They, and nearly every other technique almost requires that good technique was used on both pieces of audio. The only sure fire way to come close is to figure out which one sounds worse (direct to reverberant ratio, noise, ...


2

so you have the SPL compressing, then the CLA-2A compressing, and the SSL channel compressing.. hmmm.. why not disable the SPL compressor, then gate gently (-6 to -10dB) with lookahead in your DAW, and only then have your compression take place. of course, volume automation is the best, but when pressed for time, a cleaner workflow might get a few of these ...


2

I would try doing some upward expansion with a multiband compressor or active eq (Waves c4 or McDsp AE400). You could also duplicate your dialog track booth the hell out of the sibilant frequency and side chain a compressor that can do upward expansion (Waves Renaissance Compressor) on the original track. Every time your sibilance gets low that frequency ...


2

find a decent S and paste it in anywhere you're in dire need of one. highpass a copy of the track (with a linear phase EQ if you have to) and automate its volume upwards expansion on the high band using a multiband compressor. make yourself some coffee ;)


2

Do you memorize the dialogue and aim the microphone back and forth between the two people when their lines come up? yes This allow you to anticipate one's sentences ending and be on place for beginning of next character's sentence. Notice that it's important that your microphone is aimed at the person speaking. Which means your microphone can be between ...


2

When both persons speaking are visible I memorize the lines while the actors practice (having a script at hand might be helpful) and pan the mic between both. If the scene is split into shot/ reverse shot, I also try to get both but my priority lies on the person on-screen. Especialy when the boom operator isn't experienced, too much panning might overburden ...


2

To my ears, it does indeed sound as if there is too much build-up in the lower mids. I wouldn't say "muddy", but rather more boomy, boxy, or honky - those are three words I would use to describe it. Cutting these will clean it up for you, but as you said, this was definitely miked too close. Two more things to keep in mind for dlog editing: 1) You will ...


1

The best thing you can do when engineering ADR performances & matching source is to use your ears, but it takes the time and effort of experience to develop them in to a tool. As far as how to use them, EQ - and capture it properly in the first place - use location notes for mics used and look at pics for where the boom op will have snuck in under the ...


1

Normaly it is a combination of EQ, De-essing and Reverb. It is normaly easier to Turn the higher quality One (close) into something worse. Adding mids and removing lows and highs will make it appear further away. By damping esses and Breath you Remove close mic-ing effects. After that you can try some reverb with focus on early reflections to make it more ...


1

Lots of videos and older films on Archive.org. I'm sure you could find a good variety on there.


1

Performance will get you a long ways towards your goal. They need to project, make sure their headphone feeds aren't too loud. Are they supposed to be getting interviewed? If not keep the mic farther away in more of a boom position. Make sure you don't have any room reflections. Some of it depends on how far you want to go - believable vs "radio" and ...


1

RX2 is your best bet. Treat the crackle and the noise separately. Decrackle the crackles first (you can use decrackle locally to the offending areas) and you're left with noise. I don't know what it is, but something (well, that something is that there's some sort of signal modulation going on) tells me it has to do with electronic interference (i.e. ...


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