4

Assuming it's a "standard" sort of scene... Two Shot (won't really get wide in a car), OTS, OTS and a couple of CU's, then the most important thing you can do is to make sure you get LOTS of room tone (ie background sound) for each setup. Inevitably the noise is going to be different from one side to the other, and an editor(you or another) will need that ...


4

I would definitely use a dynamic microphone like everyone else is mentioning, but I would also use a pad. I've done a few vocal recording for hardcore bands and a lot of times they are clipping even with the preamp gain at the lowest. A 50db pad would be great and you won't have to back away from the mic all that much and introduce the room into the ...


3

As others have rightly said, the problem you are experiencing is called clipping. Clipping occurs when the signal input to a step of sound processing (such as the mic capturing the sound, the computer recording it, or any hardware in between touching it) can't handle the level of the signal in whatever form it is in. The end result of clipping is that the ...


3

This is caused by one of two things... either your going past the sound pressure your mic can handle, or you're clipping at some point (usually on the computer). A) As suggested, you can step away from the mic or reposition the mic. An alternative is to simply look away from the mic a bit when you scream. B) Often the issue is clipping, not the SPL at the ...


3

The best sound is not from neither the mouth nor the chest, it's from the golden spot in between. See, the mouth gets you all the treble you need, and then some, whereas the chest is all core and bass. By forgetting your eyes altogether, and giving all your focus on the sound using the eyes for nothing but coarse guidance, you can find a softer, fuller, more ...


2

To answer your first quesiton, very dense and thick foam (properly attached too to prevent vibration transference - as in, not just "set and forget" flopped ont top of the car) should do the trick. That's effectively what the Rycote rain covers are in a general sense - thick and dense over-sized foam to help absorb the rain drop sounds from transferring to ...


2

In my experience it depends on the microphone, voice of the actor and booming experience. The low end of a voice is created by the chest not the mouth. For intelligibillity the mouth is important, S an T's are pronounced at the lips. If you're a great boom artist, you can point at the chest (from above) in line with mouth. This way you get the best of both ...


2

Swap the mic for a dynamic if you can and give that a go. Try reducing the mic gain on the interface if you can. Using a compressor on the DAW won't help. And if you're in control and can ride the gain before you let rip that might help a bit ;)


2

I don't have enough rep to comment, so I'll answer as best I can. First, I think the biggest thing you're going to need to deal with is the room in which the meeting takes place and the arrangement of the people speaking, physically, within that room. If the meeting can take place in a room that's relatively small, has some thick carpet on the floor and ...


2

A mixer will have multiple channels for your multiple inputs. Each channel will have a trim pot (gain knob) for adjusting the input level. (Sidenote: some channels may not have a trim, those are line-level inputs, not mic-level inputs, and they are meant for things that already at "line-level") You set your gain as you need to for each channel, nothing ...


1

The use of a field mixer is not restricted to mixing several sources into one track. It is often used to send individual sources to individual tracks. When you need to mix several sources into one track in a live dialogue recording situation, you have to dynamically deal with each of the sources as the shot goes by. Having sevral microphones continuously ...


1

With keeping gain level and distance in mind I'd suggest you get your hands on a Shure SM57. The cool thing about this dynamic mic is that it's actually an instrument mic. Great on guitar and snares, but in your case, great for recording loud vocals. I'd say; give it a try! Good luck.


1

OK, so if this is one of those utterly random class assignments where you absolutely 'must' do it with 'just an iPhone', the only way to really do this is to record your dialogue 'wild'. This requires the actors to be able to re-deliver the dialogue in-synch and in-performance, but not to camera. You simply run the iPhone over to the actors after a take or a ...


1

There are only really two ways of reducing the amount of background spill into your dialog track. Expensive directional mic on a boom Even more expensive noise-reduction software, eg Izotope RX 7. In the absence of either, then your next best option is 'any mic' as close to the speaker as possible, whilst keeping it out of shot. Tie mics (lavalier) could ...


1

I'm all for highest quality, as well. However, this presumably si not Hollywood level production, neither is it a concert recording in static setup. In location recording, what matters is getting the job done. In practice, this means dedicated recorder. How are these 4 channels fed to you? Boom and 3 wireless mics? Anyway, just a rent a 4-channel solid ...


1

Yes you should always use the boom as well as a lav, as the lav mic could sound crappy and if that's all you have then you're screwed. It could fall off, scratch against clothes, get wind noise, lots of things, but if you have a boom over the top then you're covered.


1

The h4n has two inputs, so recording these separately should be simple, which I very much recommend doing.


1

I'm not aware of any reasoning in this regard. If it was the case that pointing at the chest is better, then we'd be far more likely to clip lapel mics to people's belts and we wouldn't make headset mics at all. The only reasoning I can think of is if they also were trying to get the sounds the actor makes outside of just dialog, such as footsteps and such....


1

Unless proximity/breathing/pops are any concern, then point the mic at the sound source - i.e., the face. The only reason I could think that anyone would say different is to preclude extraneous ambient noise.


1

Blankets will help with room reflections/absorption, but they're not the best at preventing noise leakage. It sounds like you need some sort of isolation material. The best isolation product I know of is mass loaded vinyl. Perhaps you could seal the window with it, building some sort of mass loaded vinyl curtain. The problem is that stuff is extremely ...


1

I've found that somehow just really digging into the scene and story helps with that. If you get really involved in the story, and the conversation, then the cues are often fairly natural. Bill asks Clara a question, Clara responds, etc. There are always the hard to remember ones, interjections, stuff like that. And of course when the actors are ad libbing a ...


1

I've never recorded in this typical situation but i could be done. Espesecially if the image (shot and frame) show the actual location and the listener is supposed to feel this space. On loudness/heaviness of background noises. It depends on the time of day (evenings will have less traffic), but also the car model and if windows or doors are being opened ...


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