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Resonance and reverberation are, indeed, more or less just two aspects of the same phenomenon. The difference is whether you focus on what happens to the time-domain representation (reverb) or frequency-domain representation (resonance) of a signal. For instance, when you seed a room with a short impulse and observe how a microphone picks up a far longer ...


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The definition you gave seems to have the definitions for resonance and reverb built into one, which makes it more confusing. From a physics perspective, everything has various resonant or natural frequencies. Here's a little tidbit if you're interested. These characteristics are known better to musicians as harmonics. As I learned in physics: Resonance ...


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As said by coaxmw, sweep normally means a sine oscillator starting at 20 Hz and then smoothly “gliding” up through the entire audible spectrum. Now, in principle you could also do this with other types of oscillators. E.g. dubstep music, as it were, uses lots of sawtooth sweeps. Band-filtered noise can also be considered an oscillator – &...


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a sweep is usually sine waves at 20hz to 20khz played smoothly. I've only ever heard the term sine wave sweep, never white noise sweep fwiw.


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I thought that people took a narrow bandpass filter starting at 20hz and sweeping up to 20K across white noise for the purpose of creating an impulse response - you play the sound through your speaker and record how the room reacts. I think sine wave sweeps can be used for that purpose too but I guess I thought a noise sweep was a distinct method of making ...


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