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I have some strong feelings on this topic, so apologies in advance for the longish post. Here's how I organize my audio files: I don't! Before you throw up, let me explain… What I mean is that I don't sort, file or otherwise organize my audio files into folders in my operating system. Not at all. My entire working sound library is nothing more than ...


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Everyone's approach to this is gonna be different, but here's my personal ultra-low tech approach, certainly not pretending it's the best. First of all, every project gets its own HD. Every project has a three-letter code (for reference, billing, etc.) - OK, three letters plus a digit if it's a long-term account/client. Every project has an IDENTICAL high-...


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here's another one: freeSFX + Easy to navigate thematic organization + Curated generally useful incidental sounds + Free commercial use, provided not main focus (full license) - relatively small collection (a couple of thousand sounds in my estimation)


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I haven't tried their VSTs so can't guarantee they work in Logic but in theory they should work in any VST host (any DAW that supports VST)


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Found a solution: I located the ~/Library/Application Support/Soundminer/Spotting folder and replaced all the OLD FX DRIVE PATHS with "NEW DRIVE NAME" with textwrangler on all relevant smpotting.xxx files. My lists with all relevant selections are back!


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This is a Community Wiki answer, feel free to add your finds... Field Recording Databases Freesound >> http://freesound.org/ (added by yunque) + Search by license, format, bitrate, sample rate, tags, etc. + Open project, user-based (can search similar sounds recorded by the same person). - Variable quality. British Library ...


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I think for sound design elements (very basic things like a low thud, tool clutter, cork pop) it is good to give files a rudimentary searchable name. For finished sound effects with many elements you might want to add terms to the name or give it tags. Personally I would love to be independent of metadata. My library is still a work in progress. The most ...


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Export Soundminer Metadata fields to text. Import in Excel, copy paste columns. Save as txt and import back into Soundminer database. Then right click and embed metadata.


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Remove from database doesn't delete the file from your hard drive it simply excludes it from its library. I'd recommend Mac Paw Gemini:http://macpaw.com/gemini


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I bought AudioFinder for the meagre price of $70. It appears to do most of what SM does and is far far cheaper. I've found most useful and would happily recommend it.


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you can use the finder and spotlight to do a lot of databasing. The idea would be to put your metadata in the spotlight comment window - which spotlight can read in its searches. There are automator scripts out there that can take metadata from spreadsheets and embed them into the spotlight comment fields as a batch process. I'd imagine you can get good ...


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Well, i think your question is already thoroughly answerred, but i wanted to add that i use http://diskcatalogmaker.com/ It's a simple app that makes an index of your HD's and you can manage them. So backup is really easy. It's not perfect for your scenario maybe, gobbler is much close (and i love it!).


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we use Retrospect. It manages its own database across all of our backup media, so when it comes time to restore something we just search the database for the year and backup set and then grab the media that the software requests.


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Did you try gobbler? It can backup your sessions online, but what might interest you is that Gobbler can scan your drives for projects and make a database; this is searchable without the original drives connected. It even lists all the media in your Audio Files folder. And supports not only PT projects, but a growing list of DAWs and other software.


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