23

Just four letters: FLAC. Some explanation / thoughts on the subject Warning: this includes personal opinions that aren't necessarily mainstream-accepted. See AJ Henderson's answer for a somewhat more moderate view. I'd first like to say: being pedantic, there is no such thing as a lossless audio file. Audio is an analogue phenomenon, anything digital can ...


11

FLAC (free, lossless audio codec) is a non-patent encumbered audio codec that utilizes lossless compression to store the audio. There are many other lossless options that support compression, but FLAC is more or less the defacto standard. Since it is lossless, the waveform from it will exactly match an uncompressed wav, however it looks for patterns in the ...


9

The ultimate answer for this is: It depends on what material you are encoding. And the strongest scientific evidence is in the coders themselves. When encoding an mp3 using VBR (Variable Bit Rate), some encoders show how many frames were encoded using which bit rate. Here's a screenshot from LAME: You will notice that only 10 frames out of 10735 were ...


3

FLAC being the most popular one, there is a comprehensive list of lossless compression formats on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lossless_compression#Audio Compressed files should be processed by the CPU before being used. This is not preferable in professional editing as CPU is a very valuable and expensive resource than storage space. Since WAV ...


3

this is quite informative: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/may00/articles/mp3.htm The gist is: as long as any signal can be represented as the sum of sine waves (Fourier's work), and as long as you can deconstruct any signal back to sine waves (FFT, DCT math), then you can use a different way of encoding just the data that's required to reconstruct an ...


3

Random data is hard to compress because it is random, data with a pattern is easy to store. Audio data itself appears fairly random at first, but in actuality there is a pattern to it. Additionally, when you allow certain details to be altered in ways that are not that noticeable to listeners, you can make it fit a pattern that is far easier/smaller to ...


2

Suppose you want to save the following sequence of numbers: 0123456789 0123456789 You can store those numbers individually, which would be equivalent to how uncompressed .wav or .bmp works. But, if you agree on certain rules and define those in a certain format (like mp3), you can also save these numbers without explicitly writing down the value of each ...


2

Try Speakerphone from Audio Ease. It has a dropped frame simulation you can hear starting from 15:20 in their Youtube video on this product page http://www.audioease.com/Pages/Speakerphone/speakerphone.html


2

The upper one is definitey the better one. Spectrograms (like the ones you produced with Spek) are used to display and inspect tendencies over time. For example if some noisy signal is present all the time, it will show up as a straight horizontal line somewhere: You can determine some general properties, like that 20 Khz cut, but an average frequency ...


1

Perhaps not the most practical and flexible solution: you don't have to emulate, you can apply manual changes in bandwidth using a tool like NetBalancer and you can start some heavy downloads, use a speed tester etc to strain the connection


1

Psychoacoustic compression (mp3 for example) works by removing the parts that you don't hear. That means if there is a loud signal you won't hear a quiet signal that is shortly after. For that time you do not need to save information. Same thing frequency based. If you have a very loud frequency, then you won't hear a quiet frequency nearby. So you have ...


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