3

I always try to drag myself in front of a mic when I have a nasty cold. As difficult as it can be, a scratchy throat and flem filled lungs and sinuses can make for some great monster source if you get creative with it. Something I learned many years ago that can be useful for many sound design tasks is the experimentation with mixing attack transients of ...


3

Ive been doing a lot of hyper-real monsters in the past year and I've come accustom to laying down my own vocal tracks first to start building a foundation so I can start getting a sense of the personality. Then Ill mess with that as far as pitch and any light modulation and then start getting weird with animals and build around what I did with my own vocals....


3

I have the Tim Prebble Seals library, and its amazing! I have also used my 7 year old daughter and 9 year old sons voice to a great degree. The human voice is an indistinguishable element for Monster design. Many of us are already close to monster status, and the cultural baggage and recognition for the audience is very strong.


2

This guy, Fletcher901, is doing a good job - he explains how he makes the Predator sound too:


2

It depends on what the monster looks like etc. whether it's a cartoon, science fiction monster or you just want to make an animal "hyper-real" For me though, I like using musical instruments (especially deep woodwind instruments such as a bass clarinet or bassoon) and then just completely messing with them!


2

Also... get some friends and do both single and group zombie sounds... Groups always sound better than layered singles. And you might also want to play around with this app: http://orfeasboteas.com/dehumaniser/. I tend to process the sound and then layer it against the original for best flexibility.


1

My suggestion would be to get a bunch of people together and do a voice record session. You can record as a group as well as individuals and then build up a library for you to use. The moaning will be more convincing with a human voice and you can always augment any specific attacks with more layered sounds.


1

I think you've already hit the nail on the head in your question; just do some moaning, and various types of breathing yourself and pitch that down too; scrap the lion growls! But don't just pitch it down, stretch it too, long and slow. If you want to layer it up even more though, then you could add some wet slurping squelching sounds etc. for 'freshly ...


1

The scariest monster I ever created was by granulising baby loughs/crys with ableton inbuilt granulizer/pitch shifting algorithm. Just pitch it down and make the grains short and audible. BrRRIIiiahhhhhriiiaraawwr :)


1

Pigs do great shrieks and squeals. I used these for vampires with excellent results.


1

My parents' dogs and my girlfriend's (now deceased) cat have made multiple appearances as monsters. I do a bunch of my own monster vocalizations as well. Long ago I also did some recordings of a device at a museum that approximated the mechanics of a dinosaur's roar, and used that for a few things. It was essentially a bellows and a long plastic tube/hose ...


1

The giant storks in Marrakesh make this sound!


1

I'm pretty sure I watched a programme about the “clicks” used in The Predator and I'm sure they said a Magpie was responsible for the sound.


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