4

I strongly recommend you to get a copy of Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema by David Sonnenschein. It will give you a good idea of all the elements to look out for in sound design for film.


3

Lots of good food for thought already posted here. One thing that has always been helpful for me is to simplify my workflow. Today we are presented with an astronomical amount of choices so much so that I think it can sometimes stifle creativity instead of promote it. Scads of plugins and unlimited tracks to name a couple of culprits. A technique that I'll ...


2

+1 for Andrew's suggestion. My suggestion for you would be to break down film sound into components and approach the film for each one. Please feel free to look at my old dissertation if it helps you in that regard. http://ianpalmersound.com/2010/08/26/64/


2

It sounds like you're still working your way into this process, and I think you're going to have a hard time getting much that is substantive from such a broad approach. You'll probably find it much more beneficial to focus on smaller bytes of information first. Select a scene only, and watch it over...and over...and over............and over. Get to the ...


1

Since you seem to have a lot of free reign for the sound to take the forefront here, I would go big before settling on something simple like a high pitched tone, pulse, or low heartbeat pulse. What kind of soundtrack is replaying in his head? The lingering aftershocks in his mind of the storm, a particular cry from one of his mates, a crashing spray, ...


1

Check out the the first episode of season 3 of House of Cards for some inspiration. Ren Klyce is the sound designer and the sequence I'm thinking of in the hospital is a really fantastic scene depicting this exact effect. I also think of a pulsing cycle of pain/sound when I think of bad headaches. A pushing and pulling of pressure and very enveloping ...


1

There are a few things to keep in mind here, and ill also offer some advice on things you can do. First off people will be watching this on all sorts of mediums, TV's, laptops, iPad's and what ever people use to watch movies these days. Most of these devices have poor audio output built in and generally lack in the high frequency and low frequency ...


1

Two things I regularly study nowadays are: How are sounds choices playing contextually to the story/moment? (big, small, brash, subtle, etc) How are "real" sounds cinematicaly cheated effectively? (Example: hot cars always sound like a slip-n-slide and it feels "right" on screen, but hardly ever do we hear a car in real life creating those kinds of skids ...


1

I agree with Andy Lewis on this one and feel that all of the elements are in the soundtrack are there to serve the story. With the elements in the soundtrack being dialog, sound effects, ambiance and score, one has to look at all of these things and how they tell the story, as well as how they work together to make everything complete i.e. the mix. Is the ...


1

All the things you mention are usually there to try and give an emotive response for the audience when viewing. Try to think why the sounds are being used instead of just how they are used too. Think of what the characters might be thinking/feeling at any given point any how the sound is reflecting this. This might make it easier to piece together the ...


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