13

This immediately reminded me, first off, of an excerpt for Dave Yewdall's book about the "Big Sound" (or Hollywood Sound): The "Big Sound" The key phrase being "It's a philosophy, an art - an understanding of what sounds good together to make a bigger sound." The 'Hollywood sound' is a gestalt, or culmination, of individual parts and pieces fitting ...


6

The first thing to say here is, I'm not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV. Second thing to say... you should talk to a lawyer to answer questions about your particular situation definitively. Having said that, I found a nice article about the various issues related to DJing, etc. I believe the bit below should be applicable to you, though I'd recommend ...


4

Here is how I look at it - don't use the stolen sounds, but imitate them using original material to the best of your ability. If the director wants the "hollywood" sound, show off your abilities by making your effects sound like the ones he or she is so fond of. Make this director want the "Melissa" sound. If you're worried about time already spent - don't....


4

The usual way, I suppose. All you need to do to establish a legal copyright is affix a copyright notice on your recording or lyrics. The term "affix" simply means you write your name and the year the song was written next to the copyright symbol. The format looks like this: © YOUR NAME 2011 That's all there is to it. In fact, it's not ...


3

As far as I understand it the copyright applies more or less only for electronically, and preferably (but not exclusively) musical, designed sound. Like the ringtones from polyphonic/PCM-cellphones to name one thing. When it comes to Zippo's, Cadillac doors, Harley-motors, the buttons on a Nintendo NES, et cetera, it is, still as far as I know, like taking a ...


3

Be sure that you are clear that you did not do the original work and that you are using these "re-works" only as a demonstration of your skills. You don't want to appear to potential employers that you are trying to claim ownership over the original work. If the owner of the video has a problem with you using their work, they will probably just send you a ...


3

I did this also for my portfolio, just put this : "All of the clips are the property of their respective publishers and distributors (Ubisoft, Eidos, E.A., whatever...), and are used here only for demonstration purposes" at the beginning of the video and in the description. I never had a problem.


2

Seems like a tough situation. Since you're not being paid for this I would stick to your guns, make your points to the director and get as many other people in the production team to back you up, I bet he wouldn't like it if you simply replaced a scene from this movie with one from another film... If this were a real world situation where you were being paid ...


2

It sounds like a major client management situation. What i recommend is taking a plank wood, about a metre long, then hammering some nails through one end... Ha, kidding. But you should never let a client make you do something that's "over the line" for you (i'm talking serious stuff, not just insisting on some cliche like a heartbeat or underground wind). ...


2

You won't be infringing copyright, because names and titles can't be copyrighted, but you could face legal action over trademark infringement. The exception is when a brand name or trademark is so entrenched and widespread that it becomes a generic term, hoover being the most familiar example. If you want to stay on safe ground, then you're better off ...


2

The Software License Agreement for Mac OS X 10.7.3 suggests that it is legally NOT OK to us the System Voices for anything else than your personal, non-commercial use: "G. Voices. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, you may use the system voices included in the Apple Software (“System Voices”) (i) while running the Apple Software and (ii) ...


2

I am not a lawyer, but my understanding is that with CC licenses, as long as the licence doesn't specify share-alike or non-commercial, you would even be fine to use it in a screening that you charged for. Non-commercial prohibits ALL commercial use, so if it has an NC tag on it, you can't use it. If it has an SA (Share alike) tag on it, they you must ...


2

Just be sure to conform to what is specified by the licence, and you will be fine. So obviously any Non Commercial license (NC) will not work for you. The "Share-Alike" one may be one to avoid--I don't know how 'viral' it is. If you put a (CC) (SA) song in a video, does that mean the video also has to be (CC) (SA)? At the very least, talk to a lawyer ...


2

Yep, this is a great place for that question, though I did add a copyright tag... Understanding that I'm an NOT a lawyer, just someone who's dealt with a lot of lawyers and intellectual property law, the rule of thumb is that if YOU record it you own the copyright and can do whatever you want with it. There's a legal doctrine called the "right of publicity" ...


2

I am not a lawyer, but your parallel is a little off. A better parallel would be to say that someone owns the rights to make a particular type of specialized brush. Midi instruments can be copyrighted as the method of synthesis is non-trivial. You couldn't copyright, say, using basic fixed waveforms, but when you start combining things in to a midi ...


1

It can be, yes. The only way you'd be legally allowed to manipulate or change someone else's MIDI is if they gave you permission to do so.


1

If the sheet music you are talking about is classical music, they are in public domain because the copyrights expire some time after composer's death (50-70 years depending on the laws of the country). If they are contemporary works you can't record and distribute them without getting permission. You can rely here for not taking action but if you want to ...


1

The sounds from the game would be part of the copyright on that game. You can't use them while the work is under copyright unless your use is covered by fair use or by a license from the company that holds the copyright. The exception to this would be if they licensed the audio from someone else, in which case you would have to obtain the license from ...


1

IANAL - It depends on the license for the soundfont. If you purchased the soundfont then most likely you're ok. A soundfont licensing should be very similar to any other sound library. However, you extracted the sounds from a game - it's a little more blurry there... unless you are specifically referencing the game itself, it which case it might be ...


1

With all due respect I beg to differ from AJ Henderson's answer. I don't think your parallel is off at all. Color and sound are a very good parallel in the context of trademarks and patents vs. copyright. Actually there is a patent for the color "International Klein Blue (IKB)" published in April 1961 after it was applied for by French artist Yves Klein. ...


1

Am I entitled to credit or compensation? If you have copyright for these particular sounds, then using the sounds without your permission is technically a copyright infringement. However, whether you want to go court is another topic, more likely the infringement that bothers you can be solved simply by negotiating. If you've signed a contract where you've ...


1

So I contacted a Solicitor who basically said it was a grey area and said fairly much the same as Chuck. So I contacted Renault, and they said that they will give me permission to use the name for a limited time.


1

with sound, the copyright is on the recording, and so if it's a device making a sound and you record it, i don't think there's a copyright issue, unless the device is playing a pre-recorded (or otherwise predefined) sound.


1

Wow. Can't believe your 'friend' would dare to ask you this. It's the equivalent of him ripping off a Hollywood script and passing it off as his own. A) never compromise your own personal integrity. B) free gigs never turn out well. Tell your friend to start paying you min wage for the project. Money begets respect. Respect for your time and respect for ...


1

Get that conversation in writing. An ordinary email to the guy expressing your worries, then wait for the reply. Just in case......


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