6

Hey Young George, emails aren't contracts. And getting someone to sign a contract is usual business practice, so go ahead and do it without feeling uneasy about it. You can tell him it's how you always work, if you fear it will create distrust, but it never happened to me in the past. And if he doesn't want to sign it that's a huge red flag.


2

My personal take on it is that we set out with a turnaround time at the beginning, and we put it in writing as one of the line items within the contract - in some regards its a 'handshake deal' with some clients beyond that in terms of if we have to meet that drop-dead agreed date or if we have some wiggle room but we want to finish around that listed ...


2

its unusual to ask for points. I'd take the money, hope the show does well, and move on to the next gig.


2

I give contracts to my closest friends when I hire them for work. It is the only way to guarantee that everyone is on the same page and everything is spelled out in case there is a disagreement/misunderstanding down the road.


1

I personally have no idea what UK rates are. Having said that - Sometimes studios have rates that they will generally pay freelancers or a series of rates based on budget, experience and what your tasks are. Flying there - Are they paying for room and board or are you flying in on your own because you need the project? Do you know what a standard staff ...


1

I find on a number of freelance projects, the client wants some standard contract signed to some effect with a "work-for-hire" type clause in it - essentially stating any design work you do and audio materials you provide will be owned by them. Obviously this is something I avoid in general, unless the price is right, but the big question ...


1

Don't take risks, if there's anything that makes you feel like you have to get a written agreement for it. If the opposite side doesn't understand your intention, then they aren't acting professionally, nor maturely. If there's no written agreement, then there's nothing you can fall back on, if something changes or goes differently from what was agreed. I ...


1

Late to the game ... sorry. I have never heard of a sound designer getting points ... ever, and I've been doing this for quite a while now.


1

When I negotiate freelance projects, I typically give clients a rough mix to review and request changes, plus 1 or 2 rounds of revisions after that to get to final mix. This simply means that this is all that will be completed under the negotiated rate (be that flat project fee or hourly/daily/etc.). Any work or revisions requested beyond that will be done ...


1

I have never uploaded stuff to a royalty free site but I have read a lot of the different contracts. Usually, they require you to formally email them a request to remove your pieces from the site so that they are no longer for sale. You cannot get back the pieces of music you have already sold you can only choose to no longer sell them. It is apart of the ...


1

First guess, written request to the company. Even if you speak to someone on the phone about it, they're probably going to want a written formal request for their records. It helps protect you legally as well, so I would send it in via certified mail/signature confirmation so that you have some record as to when it was received.


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