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9

It depends on the application. A 1/4" TRS (tip, ring, sleeve) connector can be used to carry either BALANCED mono signal, or UNBALANCED stereo signal. Recall that a balanced signal requires three conductors: signal+, signal-, and common. Stereo on a single cable also requires three conductors: left, right, and common. So, a TRS can be either carry a ...


6

Fred42Vid's answer is good (though the 1/4" jack is probably a balanced TRS). I wanted to add something, though; on a mixer, when you have both a TRS and an XLR, they sometimes have subtly different signal paths. Specifically, the microphone input is often run through a second op-amp to boost its signal by about 20dBu before the main gain stage (controllable ...


5

Those are DIN connectors. DIN line-level signals expect a different impedance than is usual for RCA or XLR connections. IIRC you can put a resistor in series to convert to RCA. I'm not sure what signal level and impedance DIN microphones use. I'll see what I can dig up. It looks like this is a dictation microphone. One of the connectors allows you to ...


3

XLR connector pros compared to jacks/TRS connectors: It is not as easily pulled out (it locks when connected). It is thicker; thus more rugged The physical interface is larger (pins into tubes), thus better electrical connection. The physical construction makes it much harder to cause disconnection failures due to pulling and pushing. The signal ground is ...


3

If you are referring to the hardware that retains the jack, in the US it is a 3/8-32 jam nut. Most likely.


2

You've gotten the basic answer already, but the flip-side is that TRS/XLR aren't necessarily always balanced. You probably won't run into unbalanced TRS/XLR in any decent store bought cable, but it's always good to have a cable tester (or multi-meter) to confirm.


2

The splitter cable you're using combines the 2 stereo inputs into the 3 pin XLR connector, putting the left channel in pin 2 and the right in pin 3, or the other way around. You can only use that type of connection with a system that specifically uses XLR type connectors for stereo signals. That's not the case with normal performance and PA devices, where ...


2

Turning the monitor control all the way should give you only the playback source in the output. The monitor control is there to set the amount of direct input to playback when you're tracking live musicians. In your case you just want to hear the playback at 100%, without any noise introduced at the inputs. Hope this helps!


2

The mini-jack will be a stereo jack socket, which requires a TIP/RING/SLEEVE plug to interface correctly. The two signals you will need are TIP/SLEEVE and RING/SLEEVE - with SLEEVE being the signal ground. You should be able to obtain a stereo minijack to RCA converter cable or plug adapter that will do this for you. The signal loss across this connection ...


2

The "Tape" input is effectively identical to "Aux". It is almost certainly an ordinary line-level input. It should be trivial to connect the speaker or headphone or line output from your computer to your stereo box. It would be enormously helpful to show us a photo of the BACK of the amplifier unit.


2

Slide the collar to unlock the coupler. Slide the latch on the plug away from the coupler, then twist anti-clockwise to release. https://www.neutrik.com/media/8072/download/speakon-nl4mmx-coupler.pdf?v=1


2

Assuming that the preamp outputs are line level, then yes it is perfectly safe to do this. You will wire the connection up as follows: Ground (RCA) to Pin 1 and 3 (XLR) Signal (RCA) to Pin 2 (XLR) A converter plug should be fine and it should have the same wiring as this.


1

Since the mic jack isn't connected to anything on the other end it shouldn't present a problem. Just the same, I'd cover it with a piece of electric tape to avoid any confusion about which to use.


1

You should look if there is a jack called "AUX", it will take an external source as an input for your amplifier, otherwise no easy way to do it.


1

The speakers: have a stereo pair of regular RCA input sockets; and also a stereo 3.5mm TRS AUX input socket. The soundcard: has a stereo pair of regular RCA output sockets; and also a stereo 3.5mm TRS AUX output socket. The compatible cable configurations: stereo pair RCA plugs. <†> stereo 3.5mm TRS plug. stereo pair RCA plugs. <‡> stereo pair ...


1

These speakers include a 3.5 mm audio cable that enables you to connect them like headphones. You can plug the speakers into the audio interface’s headphone output, at least for now. The speakers also have RCA inputs, so what you ultimately want would be a very standard cable with stereo RCA male plugs at both ends. I recommend you get a high-quality name-...


1

If you are able to wire an adapter yourself, you can do it this way (it will not be a balanced connection though). Shield to XLR male Pin 1 (Ground) White wire goes to XLR male Pin 2 (Signal) Bridge XLR male Pin 3 to XLR Pin 1 (Ground) Important! Do not send phantom power to the microphone (it will damage it!)! Use the inline power pack with battery to ...


1

As the other answers have said, banana plugs will not fit. However, so-called “pin” plugs are designed to fit speaker jacks, and a little searching suggests there also exist adapters from banana plugs to pins, though as a much more obscure item; here's an unfortunately unavailable example which nicely shows the difference in size between banana plugs and ...


1

You cannot run SPDIF cables on an iMac , simply because SPDIF use RCA connectors .. Your data will get scrambled if you use an adapter on it. If you want to use 7.1 your iMac. The only way you can do it is with a significant quality AD/DA Convertor (Sound Card), which works a primary sound card for your iMac. Your iMac will generate outputs only based on ...


1

they're rings ;) you can make them anything depending on your connector. 1/4" TRS is normally mono (single channel) - balanced, like an XLR. Read up here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS_connector#Tip.2Fring.2Fsleeve_terminology


1

There is no specific expected lifetime of an audio jack. It depends on the quality of the jack, though they are pretty basic, so it is unlikely to be the point of failure of most devices. On your computer for example, I would expect just about any part of your computer to fail before the audio jack itself failed. It's kind of like asking how often a power ...


1

you could ask hawkswood where they get there plugs from, as they build the NP1 solutions for FR2, which uses the same plug. I use the tamiya batteries with the fostex cable, but those cables are really hard to come by now a days. It's a shame because the tamiya battery solution is such a great idea and works really nicely.


1

For what its worth, there are dozens if DC connectors like that, but they all slighty differ in connector size and voltage so it may be near impossible to know for sure. However, I know some FR2 users who got their units modified with a Hirose connector in order to run NP1s and other such outside power sources.


1

I work on live events. i have a macbook pro and i use a usb interface (apogee one) for walk up music cues, and a di box with an earth lift switch (interspace industries pc di box about £65) out of the headphone socket for another output like background music(any di box with an earth lift will do) with the earth lift switch on, that gets rid of the power ...


1

Jamie may be correct about it needing a power supply. Most microphones that utilize more than three inputs do require a matching power supply. Another possibility is to do some research on the specific models you're looking at. If you can find information concerning the pinout, then you'll be one step closer to figuring out how to interface it with modern ...


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