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I have recorded here in switzerland about -20 C or more. I can recommend you this: Recording in low temperatures are not such a problem, the difficult parts are putting the gear out in the cold air an back. Going into the cold: -You need to acclimate your gear before using. If you come out of a car (+25 C) into a winterday (-25 C) you have a difference from ...


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To tag onto what @Dave offered up, try micing ice cubes dropped into warm water with a hydrophone. You'll get a different perspective of the thawing, crackling sound without all the room noise/potential preamp hiss.


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I like dropping a bunch of ice into some warm water, but you have to mic it hot in a ridiculously quiet room, it's very quiet. It will give you those initial cracks.


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Check out the answers to previously asked similar questions: Tips on creating "frozen bodypart ripped apart" iceberg crackling They should help


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I got some great ice cracks by holding a stack of about 40 blank CDs tightly and twisting them. You get a good ice-crystals-popping sound like Stavrosound mentions. The CDs should probably not be used for data or music after doing this, however.


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I've had some success with using styrofoam, like the stuff electrical good are packed in. You sort of twist it in your hands, and as you fingers mover over it, you get that cracking kind of noise. Ice age, the animated feature, has some good ice sounds in it, as cliched as it sounds.


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Try a frozen, wet cloth? Then wring it out in front of the mic. Also record the ice crystals popping you hear when you open the freezer. A recording I did of those is always a go-to icey swntr I like. Try glass sounds too... Glass cracking, fine glass debris (to create a more hightened version of ice crystal pops. Think not just of the ice, but of the ...


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