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6

Audio CDs are encoded with 16-bit values. Higher bitrates are generally used for editing, not for playback. You can write 24-bit WAV files to an optical disc, of course, but it will not be a standards complying audio CD.


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As quality is sacrificed in favour of quantity (mp3's and tiny pplastic earphones) I hope we see a return to concerts and live sound events being the best option for experiencing pure audio. Social events opposed to elitist collections. It used to be that if you could hear music and you traced it to its source you would find a musician or a musical ...


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I think there are two basic near to medium term answers: 1) music alone will move mostly to cloud based streaming anywhere type storage - meaning basically you're not going to have anything physical at all. Pandora, last fm, and others already do this, and Google, Amazon, Apple et all are making major moves in that direction as well. Artists and labels ...


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Short answer, no. It's all to do with the sampling frequency & something known as the Nyquist Limit. Wikipedia has a description of this at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyquist_frequency but don't be too surprised if your eyes glaze over at the first paragraph ;) A CD is recorded at 44.1KHz - which you would think would be sufficient to get at least ...


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FLAC is lossless compression. FLAC itself is compatible with the bit depth and sample rates of your studio masters. However, those listening won't always have sound hardware that are compatible with that bit depth and sample rate. (This problem has nothing to do with FLAC itself.) If you want guaranteed compatibility, distribute FLAC at 44.1kHz 16-bit, ...


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There are actually a couple of different routes here. If your CD player absolutely must be at one location and you must be at another, you could look at squeezebox, or any of the home audio companies out there. There are many products that will do what you want - some will require some computer/IT knowledge. What might be much more suitable is to stop ...


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If you are happy with the sound you get from a smartphone or PC , I would argue you'd be happy with an all-in-one. I don't think the "22w" the Onkyo says it'll provide would be enough for a pair of speakers that would do the dynamic range and fidelity of classical music justice , especially as a subwoofer isn't a good-match for classical music so won't be ...


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what will be the next physical form of sharing sound if it ever will, what do you think? It will be the same as for other data, just as CD and analog formats (to a certain extent) were. There's already Digipak, which although is almost the same as "a CD". But apart from that, USB sticks or flash memory cards or just distribution over a network, just ...


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There will be more file formats developed for streaming or downloading, but can't see any new dedicated sound carriers being developed. There will likely just be advances in general-purpose physical memory. Vinyl will probably outlive CDs as a niche market, and people will experiment with objects which promote and enable linking to music data, like ...


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I'm going into philosophical mode here... Are music and sound in their essence not intangible things? You can't hold it, own it or touch it. It is the carrier of a recording of that music or sound that is the tangible part, and this has been defined by technological constraints. Then, the recording industry added value and desirability to the tangible ...


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