8

One of my classmates at Vancouver Film School is 47 years old and has no experience in sound design and is actually good at his work. Its how badly you wanna learn. As far as finding a job goes, I know people who've been in this field for a very long time but still don't have a job. Finding a job has got to do more with how good you are at your work (1st) ...


5

To which I reply, "Well yes, I was responsible for all of the sound of the films that I've worked on and have done the dialog edit on every film I have a sound supervisor credit on." There are a number of times though that I haven't heard anything back when I send in a resume Herein lies the problem, as I see it. The one major part you omitted, in my ...


4

This is just me coming off-the-cuff, but imho if you plan on becoming a "professional sound designer" then I'd skip that masters degree. I doubt very highly that having that degree will get you any more jobs than you would've gotten without it, and it will surely put you into a great deal of debt. However, if your aim is to pursue your dream into the realm ...


4

Tough situation, but one we've all grabbled with at some point. Use your downtime wisely,if you commute via public transport, read books, sound mags, get that knowledge in. If you drive, listen to podcasts, or even rip youtube videos and convert to audio. Like a language, if you don't immerse yourself in it, you'll lose your edge. This doesn't get you a ...


3

Just do it. Know that you're taking a risk financially, because there's no guarantee for work (you have to be active in finding it) and there are a lot of people working in and studying for the field, with the same or stronger determination as you. So you need to be active in networking and giving yourself out as someone that people trust and will want to ...


3

No you are not to old. I started at 30 and have been doing it successfully for 28 years now. Get an entry level job (driver, apprentice, assistant) at a sound house. You will meet people and you will learn how it is really done. A HUGE part of success is who you know. You will find out quickly if you have the feel, the talent, the creativity and the ...


3

Amateurs seek praise. Professionals look for critique. also: stop looking at the world through that tiny screen on your phone. Real life is super HD, so go outside and play! also: every task requires or can benefit from creativity, so practice being creative. also: get enough sleep, eat right, exercise.


2

Most people are sound or audio designers. There aren't that many of us who are audio coders; I think we're a small community. Audio programming roles aren't normally done by a specialist - normally they do other jobs like AI or Physics or Graphics... I spent about a decade working for a company that specialised in sound cards before that market faded. We ...


2

Do everything you can. If you wish to work as an freelancer, or even if you want to work in a company, your contacts are and will be everything, because they are, if any, those that generate projects for you. If you have no contacts, you won't have projects other than those that you generate by yourself. There are many ways to go on doing this, just as ...


2

I am doing my final year in Interactive media design. I spent last three years studying different types of media and what I have discovered is that what fascinates me the most is sound. Since I remember I was fascinated by sound and music, but I never thought I could go that far with it. Due to the nature of my course, which is not only dedicated to sound, I ...


2

Make sure you know how to use Pro Tools. Most places here in the UK use it and wont have the time or money to start training you up.


2

Don't give up. And perhaps find a position at a sound facility that may not be sound related. You need to find a community or mentors. Even if you are a scheduler or a sales guy, you can make connections, learn, and show initiative while still paying the rent. I have even taught classes at the company gym just to have the freedom of an employee pass and the ...


2

Don't despair, we've all been there more or less. I had to work unrelated jobs for 6 years before I could build my own studio and transition to sound design. It has been crucial in my development as a person, and as Tim said, during these 6 years I found out that sound design is definitely the career I want for myself.


2

Keep calling and emailing, managers (mostly) love people who just show they're keen. With little experience, it already proves to them that you'll work hard. Keep Volunteering when you can.. even once a week if that's all the time you have.. Don't take no for an answer basically. After all, you're offering to work for free. Getting knocked back is ...


2

I was walking with a former composition instructor of mine and I asked him about career choices and being concerned about choosing the right path. He simply said: "You have to make a living and you have to make a life." He helped me put at ease the fact that you need to have both a good balance in life and an open mind to those career choices. There's no ...


2

Don't overcut. It projects insecurity, slows down the mix and pisses everyone off. Do not cut three sounds where one sound will work. Don't waste time manipulating the wrong sound trying to make it work. Find the right sound.


1

There are already some proper advises and analyses by georgi and internet human. Just adding my 2cents in the form of a questionnaire: Why did you get started doing sound in the first place? What has kept you interested over time? In what way are you different than all the others? Do you need to be in London to do this? What do you need to feel confident ...


1

looks like post houses hire runners and promote them internally when they need. yes if they're unpaid it's unethical, but there are tens of reasons in support of this too, and it seems to be the preferred way of screening candidates for full-time positions. occasionally houses like Radium offer sound designer internships (again, unpaid), at least they're ...


1

Here's a perspective from someone still at that early stage. I'm not yet at a place were I can say that the advise I got will get me were I want but I feel that it was probably the last nail in the coffin. I'm in the second year of three at a sound engineering school and at this stage it has sort of becomes time to decide if this is something you are ...


1

Very early on in my career I was tasked with editing a teaser for a movie. It was really a simple piece and I was a little stumped as to what to do. My boss just told me to have fun with it and see what happens. After I cleaned up the dialogue that was sent to me I started on the SFX. I stayed up all night and cut a pretty full soundtrack for the teaser ...


1

Great question! "Everything in good time, Arnoud" was one of the best one liners i've ever received/heard in first person. It was by our head of department at art school. Context: I was graduated and worrying about being able to fulfill my ambitions and taking the right choices. Like george hufnagi (great surname!), it put me at ease and it made me realize ...


1

The one thing which has stuck with me and resonated was that a well-regarded Sound Supervisor told me that (I'm paraphrasing) "it doesn't matter if it's the smallest short film or a biggest feature, treat everything you do like it's going to win the Academy Award". At first glance it may seem shallow. However this was told to me in the vain and context ...


1

I would "forget" the public job advertisements and contact people directly. Even visit the studios directly, if possible. I believe that many people watch those public job postings, so they will get loads of applications, which isn't a particularly good situation, neither for the recruiter, nor the applicant. Of course contacting people directly just because ...


1

I made a good friend at college who was 28 and had no previous experience with audio. After finishing the course he went straight into a post-pro house in London with ease. So go for it man, It might take time and commitment, but what doesn't.


1

oh, not again. and.. 24!! just do it man


1

Hi Ati. Please use the search function on this site. Typing in "age" got me these: Age Discrimination in the Audio Industry? Getting into business after 25? .)


1

"Chaotic Pessimism". Classic. Well, I'm finally working on my first real game at 29, but granted, i spent the better part of my 20s unfortunately not pursuing music and sound, however i do have a background in it. If you were great at sound design, no age would be too old. To start raw at 24 with no prior knowledge in sound and music can be slightly ...


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