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3

If you have enough time in advance you could pick up a cable tester that has a tone generator in it for about $20. Here's one. Pull it into the studio, run it through your mixer, and mark the point at which its output = -20 dbfs. It'll probably be close to unity gain. Then when you're out in the field you can just plug the tester into the mixer, set the ...


3

A balanced mic would certainly help. Another option is to use a direct box to go from an unbalanced mic input to a balanced line (XLR). The best bet would really be to get an actual mic with balanced output. Also, in a pinch, a 25 foot run is totally doable with an unbalanced cable if it is well shielded. It isn't ideal, but it should be workable as long ...


3

In addition to the response from coaxmw : The bandwidth of a word clock signal is much higher than an audio signal, which means you cannot transmit a word clock over an audio wireless system, neither record it on an audio track. One possible workflow for your case is to resync all clips with the audio from the audio recorder prior to editing, which is ...


3

Wordclock and timecode are different things. Wordclock sync is basically just making sure that 48K on the master is 48K on the slave device. It doesn't have any positional reference. It is good to have everything locked to a wordclock or black burst master no matter what type of work you are doing to avoid clocking errors between equipment and to prevent ...


2

The "correct" answer is: Use the money on audio. This is the consensus in the low budget filmmaking community. If you only have one thing you can spend money on, use it on a sound engineer (or better mikes). Video quality usually matters less then good audio quality, nearly no matter the production. If you've got good audio, people will almost alway ...


2

I have worked with those cameras before. Wireless is generally not a good idea. If you do go that way, make sure that you are also recording on your recorder as back up. What you can do is run a wireless link from the camera to your SD for timecode. If you do have to run cables, then make sure you have a great cable guy with you and good quality long XLRs. ...


1

The Sound Tech CM-1000 is a special unit made ONLY as an extension to the master unit CM-1000USB. The CM-1000 is NOT an ordinary microphone and will not work with ANYTHING except the CM-1000USB. Your camcorder has a typical 3.5mm stereo unbalanced mic-level audio input. However, unlike most similar microphone input connectors, most of the Canon camcorders ...


1

Sounds like you could benefit from a pre-amp of some sort to between the microphone and your camera. Your camera most likely takes a line level signal into the Aux jack. Here is an example of one way to handle your issue: The Saramonic SR-AX107 It will take the microphone and provide enough gain to get the signal up to line level. I can't vouch for the ...


1

What type of cables are you using to connect your audio interface into your camera? Does it support TRS? TRS cables generally do a great job of eliminating noise. The issue could range from gain staging (input on camera is too high), cable selection or it could be that the camera itself has a high self noise ratio.


1

Generally this kind of thing is avoided because of latency and drop out issues. The issue here is that the audio comes from the source, is digitally encoded, transmitted, then decoded. That whole process takes time. Even the fastest systems have lag. A traditional wireless system that broadcasts over radio is limited only by the speed the radio waves can ...


1

Don't go for Wireless!!! Get a cable so you can have a return signal.. that way you can at least listen to what's going into the camera...The camera crew will probably also hate having two transmitters/recievers on their camera... Always shaky business recording into camera. If I were you, and I could rent stuff, I'd get the Sound Devices 552. That way you ...


1

Maybe a phasing issue between radio mics ?


1

If the bass is lacking, then it sounds like there's a phase issue, i.e. a false connection or bleeding of channels. Quite unexpected though and not something I'd consider a feature of "a bad quality mixer".


1

Curious, this type of mixer is sturdy and doesn't start acting up suddenly (in my experience at least). What do you mean with 'tails' is that the multipin output on your mixer, with the screw on plug? If so, have you tested the XLR outputs? How do they sound? Also can you listen to both outputs without the SD702 in between?


1

You could rent a fully digital Zaxcom wireless system and use it as a camera hop. They can be rented with a backup recorder on the transmitter, so you will have an intact recording even if the radio link has dropouts. If renting a Zaxcom is not financially feasible for you, you would have to use a dual sound system recording anyway, because Sennheiser G3 ...


1

Depending on how far away the shoot is, you should get yourself a breakaway cable. Breakaway cables tend to have female xlrs and a 35mm jack on one side, and male xlrs, a 35mm jack, and a 35mm female jack on the other - all neatly contained in one cable. Breakaway cables allow you to monitor the headphone out of the camera so you can be sure of what's ...


1

using Sennheiser G3 for line input to the camera is fine, altough can be a little noisy. Just make sure to use line cables, they are wired differently both for the transmitter and receiver, it's all in the sennheiser manual. Hope this helps, Bartosz


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