7

I'm not a great authority on this, but i'll jump in anyway because you seem keen to get an answer: 79 dB spl seems to be the standard calibration for TV mixes. Commercials, from what i hear, tend to be pushed louder by ad agency execs who want their ad to thump people in the face, but it sounds like you're mixing a program so you should mix to standard spec ...


6

First off this 79 figure is based on room size. Look for the ATSC 85 document to verify. It's typical to mix to 79 for TV and 82 to 85 for film. Theatrical get's sometimes 85 up on LCR and 82 on Ls Rs. You need to take a room size measurement then using the figures in the doc above, and an SPL meter and the blue sky test tones (or pink limited mono wav ...


2

I don't know if there's an instrument that can measure this but you can calculate the RMS value of complex waveforms in many ways. It would include some maths so I would personally recommend using something like Scilab for the calculations From the wikipedia article on RMS (root mean square): ...the root mean square (abbreviated RMS or rms) is defined as ...


2

This may be down to personal preference, but I keep my studio monitors flat - even though I have about 3dB [subjective] hearing loss above about 6kHz in one ear. It was caused by illness, not by sitting too close to front of house for decades. I compensate by turning my head periodically if I need more detail, rather than upsetting the sound of the room [for ...


1

Individual hearing abilities don't really factor into the discussion beyond preferences for certain equipment or room designs. Outside of building a better listening space (eg. control room) and tweaking one's monitors with corrective processing for the listening position, there really isn't a whole lot one can do to optimize sound reproduction. There's also ...


1

You don't see it on consumer units because consumers don't need it enough to pay for it, nor could most of them tell the difference anyway judging by what most people's TV's & HiFi's sound like ;) Give a consumer a graphic EQ & they will just put a 'smile' on it without thinking any further. This is what I had to strap permanently over a consumer 2....


1

That is a Yamaha YPAO Calibration Microphone: It is used to calibrate amplifier/speaker systems in relation to the room you place it in. YPAO stands for "Yamaha Parametric Acoustic Optimiser" and here is a video about the process (in which the microphone is used):


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible