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6

These sockets and plugs are designed to work in exactly this way. When you plug a 'TS' plug into a TRS balanced jack socket, the "ring and sleeve" are bridged. This is exactly the correct way to unbalance a balanced connection. It works in the way it was designed to. Additionally, by unbalancing that output connection, you reduce the level of the output by ...


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Best practice is to connect XLR pin 2 to TIP (T), pin 3 to RING (R). Pin 1 is always GROUND. The TN, RN, GN, refer to TIP NORMAL, RING NORMAL, GROUND NORMAL, which would have additional pinouts if they were available on the connector. A "Normal" circuit is one that passes the current UNLESS a plug is inserted to break the connection (break the "NORMAL.") ...


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Use two TS cables. You need only balanced signals if the cables are really long and the signal is weak (low voltage). And of course the keyboard needs to output a balanced signal, what I doubt, because nearly all output an unbalanced signal. That's why you should use the TS cables. The keyboard provides a line-level signal, so set your interface inputs to &...


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It's not clear from your question whether you actually have a noise problem or not, but for standard length guitar cables (3 - 6 meters) a DI should not be necessary. You also didn't say what model of Focusrite interface you're using, but most of the current semi-pro models have a designated instrument input for guitar and bass; you should normally be using ...


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Here's some background information that might be useful to understand what's going on. The bare physics answer to “why is this happening” is: two wires running close together form an unintended capacitor. This capacitive coupling allows the signal in the headphone wires to cross over to the microphone wire. The longer the cable, the larger the capacitance, ...


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Will this be a problem in panning the instruments? No. A cable with XLR and a 1/4" TRS (Tip Ring Sleeve) connector is NOT a stereo cable, it's a balanced cable. Either your 1/4" input is balanced and you get better signal to noise ratio and great hum rejection. Or your 1/4" input is unbalanced and it will simply short out the out of phase component of the ...


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Your best bet is to custom build a cable solution. This is what I have done with every single mixer I have installed for my own use. This is really the only way to achieve the desired solution. Don't try and use right-angled jacks as they will get in the way of each other on this mixer. If you are not a dab hand with a soldering iron, now is a good time to ...


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What you're looking for is a 'TRRS female splitter'. Random example. This splits the TRRS into a TS microphone connector and a TRS headphones connector. If you want one of the headphones signals available on a mono connector, you need another splitter, these are known as airline headphones adapters. Random example.


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There are generally two types of signal that are found on a balanced cable. Audio signal (line level, mic level or AES/EBU Digital) Power For an audio signal, you need +ve phase and -ve phase for the signal to be balanced. For power, you need both the signal cables (+ve/-ve) and the ground connection. Notice that you don't need ground for a balanced ...


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