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6

Assuming you are dealing with human audible audio transmitted as as a line level, analogue electrical signal, then No. To put it in perspective, if your signal is one that cannot be transmitted through a solid piece of metal then you are going to already experience degradation in the wires. If your signal is high enough frequency to require transmission ...


5

The suspect area is the ¼" jack & ¼" - ⅛" adaptor. It needs to be correctly wired as a mic input to that specific jack socket, which on a Mac is a 4-pole connector, TRRS, for headset/mic combos. I can't see the whole TR[R]S to be able to guess, but even if it is correct, the mono Shure TS jack is going to be shorting the connections inside the ⅛" ...


2

The 6mm jack mainly exist for historical reasons. Long ago phone switchboards used this jack to connect callers. This was standardized for audio and was used in studios and home HiFi systems. The 3.5mm jack was developed because there was need to reduce the size of the jack for portable audio such as the Sony Walkman. Choosing one jack or the other has more ...


2

None whatsoever. Though I've heard that they can't take as much power for some reason. The reason we have 3.5mm plugs is because they allow for much smaller portable media as they take virtually no space to mention. They are, however, much easier to break - both connector and plug, they are harder to solder together as there are much smaller margins and ...


1

Usually, RF antennas coaxial cables have a 50 Ω (Ohms) characteristic impedance whereas HD-SDI cables have a 75 Ω characteristic impedance. The user manual of your line6 product actually mentions a 50 Ω antenna impedance (page 30). You should be fine if using 50 Ω coaxial cable, so not HD-SDI cables.


1

As the SM57 has a solid body, that cannot differ in its diameter, I think it definitely has to do with the XLR-connector attached to the cable. Just get a better one.


1

Actually, the bluetooth module probably has left signal, left ground, right signal and right ground. Positive and negative terminals are only seen on equipment handling balanced signals, which anything with bluetooth doesn't do. The standard way is the following: left signal -> tip right signal -> ring left ground -> sleeve right ground -> sleeve Or just ...


1

Yes, they exist. Here is one from Sony. Sony’s DRC-BT30P Bluetooth Headphone Adapter Let’s You Use Your Existing Earbuds


1

The mic100 only has balanced in/outs. If there is some specific reason you want to use this piece of gear then I would suggest you get a DI-Box. It takes a 1/4" unbalanced and gives you a balanced XLR output. The pre-amp is not needed in a functional sense for what you're doing so keep in mind, unless you're trying to get the "sound" of that piece of gear it'...


1

Two possibilities: Use an “inverse DI”. Actually, passive DIs work both ways, so you can indeed plug the balanced signal with XLR into the DI's output, and grab off two unbalanced signals at the “input” and its parallel link. Works pretty well. I use that technique occasionally to convert balanced monitor lines into (mid-panned) ...


1

If your preamp is mono there's no way to get a genuine stereo output. You can use a Y-split (TRS > 2x TS) but that's just two mono signals. If you need a stereo input then, in your case, you need another mono pre. Then just send L and R inputs to a single preamp, and then take the outs of those into your input device.


1

Theoretically, optical can carry a higher bit-rate than RCA; but I think to all practical intents & purposes, unless you're listening to 24-bit uncompressed originals, the difference will be negligible. Hi-fi buffs will argue til the cows come home that... some optical cables can 'blur' the sound; RCA is more robust over distances etc etc etc. The ...


1

There are several major ways a signal can become distorted, these impact both digital and analog signals, but in different ways. One of the largest sources (on long runs and at connectors) is attenuation, which is the loss of signal strength due to resistance on the line resulting in electricity converting to heat. It generally impacts the signal in a ...


1

There may be some signal loss from making another transition from one cable to another, but it would be no more or less than going through a 6mm extension cable. What can make more of a difference is the material used on the connectors to make sure that they get good solid contact, but surface area of the connection doesn't really matter, particularly since ...


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