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Fruity Loops is the way to go, but it is not available for mac. If all you have is a mac, get Garageband. It's like $10 and has lots of sounds available from the jump. Very beginner friendly. It took me maybe 15 minutes to learn the entirety of it just by watching Youtube videos. It has piano roll and an on-screen keyboard function so you can still make fun ...


2

Everyone has a different approach, and you'll probably hear a few of them from other folks on this site. The one common thing you'll hear, is that there is no rule that applies in every situation. What gear are you using? What's your sound source? Where is the mic positioned? How will the sound be used once you get it back into the studio? What type of sound ...


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It is definitely a sampled plucky sound. I can clearly hear it get longer on the lower notes. To get the sound, set up a track with a simple FM Pluck synth, then give it thick distortion, delays, and reverb to make the sound deliciously big.


2

Sounds like a stuccato pan flute to me. Maybe a synthetic version. Here's a link: Stuccato Pan Flute Could also be another wooden instrument though.


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a box of sand 2 coconut shells a white cabbage a balloon a pane of glass a piece of expanded polystyrene a side of ham [or bag of sand] a hammer & a blunt chef's vegetable knife ... hours of fun. You might want some footage they can see the effect on. 20 mins of Game of Thrones with the sound turned off could use all those.


1

Whilst you've said you've just started to become an EDM artist, the nature of your question seems to suggest that you're at the stage before that; you'd like to make EDM, but don't know where to begin. As such, I'll respond to the question with that in mind, and give you the bare-bone basics. I started to write everything out, but this kind of subject has ...


1

Your questions couldn't get much broader, especially as the reader isn't aware of what precisely you are a 'beginner' at... There is so much to cover. You haven't stated whether you already compose anything. Without knowing this, it's difficult to know where to start, on the music side of things. Do you wish to emulate the 8-bit sounds of a NES? I'll ...


1

Great to hear about your newly discovered hobby! Sound designers are truly the scientists of the music and audio world and they lay the groundwork for music composers all over the world. One of the most widely-used tools amongst sound designers (at least for me anyway) is their DAW. DAW's are excellent sound design environments jam packed full of all ...


1

For software, check out DAWs like Tracktion and Reaper. For hardware, take a look at the AudioBox USB audio interface. If you're wanting to record MIDI and have a synthesiser that supports the interface, Yamaha UX16.


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It depends on what she's trying to do; if she wants to play real instruments or have simple softsynth-based composition, her iPad probably already has GarageBand, and iOS GarageBand is actually a pretty good starting point, and its projects are compatible with OSX GarageBand. Then from there it's very easy to migrate to Logic X. I'm also a fan of things ...


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Fruity Loops is certainly one of the most accessible suites available. You can start with loops, and venture into sequenced parts, drop in VST plugins, output to various Rewire apps, and the UI is very intuitive.


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IMO: rule 1 is to leave enough headroom, and err on the side of leaving too much rather than too little. 24 bit recording allows us to add back 20 or 30 db of gain in post with little to no damage done. This means that look at your peaks and make sure that you have enough room to record something unexpected and louder than your current setting. rule 2 is ...


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Buy a Sony PCM D-50 and put the rest of your budget in the bank, saving for a Sound Devices 702 and external mic setup down the road.


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Here's my solution: http://sonicskepsi.wordpress.com/2012/08/31/ipad3-♥-mixpre-d-♥-auria/


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For a brand new kit, I would also suggest the Tascam DR100 MKii. These are great, not only because they have decent features for the price as well as XLR inputs, but they are one of the few handhelds around with a digital input. This means when you are wanting to upgrade you can get a SD USBPre or Mixpre-D and bypass the cheap converters and pre amps on ...


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If just starting out I don't think you need to be jumping into spending so much on a recorder straight away, unless buying second hand. If you want brand new kit, I'd strongly recommend the following: Tascam DR100 MkII - Very decent portable recorder. Internal mics are great for the price you pay for the device too, as well as having XLR inputs. Rode NTG2 ...


1

Peter Batchelor's got some good tutorials that got me started in the music arena. http://www.peterbatchelor.com/maxTuts.html


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