9

To answer your last question... " do I have a chance of producing something of even intermediate quality with what I have in my "arsenal"?", the answer is yes...Sound Design really only requires three things... two ears and a brain, and I'm going to assume that the fact that you are here and asking these questions puts you in possession of all three! :) ...


9

The industry standard right now is 24bit, 48kHz. The frame rate doesn't influence those settings. Depending on the type of work you are doing (dialog editing, foley editing, sound effects editing or design), your sample rate may vary anywhere from 48k all the way up to 192k. But 99% of the sessions that are ultimately destined for a professional dub stage ...


5

People say this a lot but listen (analyse) to the different mediums where sound design is used. I'm no expert but when I'm listening I ask myself why that sound is used as pretty much everything you hear was a conscious choice, I always try to keep that in mind. Also many sounds sound alike, think about what you think it sounds like and how you would create ...


4

I strongly recommend you to get a copy of Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema by David Sonnenschein. It will give you a good idea of all the elements to look out for in sound design for film.


4

Sound design is not something you can learn overnight, and it's far more than just sourcing sound recordings. Perhaps you should work with a sound designer on these projects and ask them to let you in on a bit of the process so you can learn in small steps. You might even find someone to help here....


3

Fruity Loops is the way to go, but it is not available for mac. If all you have is a mac, get Garageband. It's like $10 and has lots of sounds available from the jump. Very beginner friendly. It took me maybe 15 minutes to learn the entirety of it just by watching Youtube videos. It has piano roll and an on-screen keyboard function so you can still make fun ...


3

Sound design by itself is not different from composing music, it just works on a different level and operates on a different set of processes, rules and theory. Generally it may also focus on different types of sounds ("musical sounds" vs. basically any type of sound that fits for the purpose). But in a musical context or as well in a media context those two ...


3

Value-wise, this seems like a smart series of buys. It's also modular, as you get better mics and preamps in the future. Besides headphones, though, you'll also want cabling and a stand or boom; for lightweight portability and cost, I use Manfrotto 001B Nano light stands with 1/4" to 3/8" adapters for pistol grips. You can always use a painter's pole or make ...


2

Good starter kit - now just get out there and do some field recording, you'll soon adapt, modify or change the gear to suit your own particular needs as you progress. Just a couple of shortcomings with your gear - (1) you will definitely need wind protection for the inbuilt mics on the Marantz; which you could make yourself out of faux fur, if strapped for ...


2

+1 for Andrew's suggestion. My suggestion for you would be to break down film sound into components and approach the film for each one. Please feel free to look at my old dissertation if it helps you in that regard. http://ianpalmersound.com/2010/08/26/64/


2

It sounds like you're still working your way into this process, and I think you're going to have a hard time getting much that is substantive from such a broad approach. You'll probably find it much more beneficial to focus on smaller bytes of information first. Select a scene only, and watch it over...and over...and over............and over. Get to the ...


2

Everyone has a different approach, and you'll probably hear a few of them from other folks on this site. The one common thing you'll hear, is that there is no rule that applies in every situation. What gear are you using? What's your sound source? Where is the mic positioned? How will the sound be used once you get it back into the studio? What type of sound ...


2

It is definitely a sampled plucky sound. I can clearly hear it get longer on the lower notes. To get the sound, set up a track with a simple FM Pluck synth, then give it thick distortion, delays, and reverb to make the sound deliciously big.


2

Sounds like a stuccato pan flute to me. Maybe a synthetic version. Here's a link: Stuccato Pan Flute Could also be another wooden instrument though.


1

Great to hear about your newly discovered hobby! Sound designers are truly the scientists of the music and audio world and they lay the groundwork for music composers all over the world. One of the most widely-used tools amongst sound designers (at least for me anyway) is their DAW. DAW's are excellent sound design environments jam packed full of all ...


1

For software, check out DAWs like Tracktion and Reaper. For hardware, take a look at the AudioBox USB audio interface. If you're wanting to record MIDI and have a synthesiser that supports the interface, Yamaha UX16.


1

It depends on what she's trying to do; if she wants to play real instruments or have simple softsynth-based composition, her iPad probably already has GarageBand, and iOS GarageBand is actually a pretty good starting point, and its projects are compatible with OSX GarageBand. Then from there it's very easy to migrate to Logic X. I'm also a fan of things ...


1

Fruity Loops is certainly one of the most accessible suites available. You can start with loops, and venture into sequenced parts, drop in VST plugins, output to various Rewire apps, and the UI is very intuitive.


1

IMO: rule 1 is to leave enough headroom, and err on the side of leaving too much rather than too little. 24 bit recording allows us to add back 20 or 30 db of gain in post with little to no damage done. This means that look at your peaks and make sure that you have enough room to record something unexpected and louder than your current setting. rule 2 is ...


1

Buy a Sony PCM D-50 and put the rest of your budget in the bank, saving for a Sound Devices 702 and external mic setup down the road.


1

Here's my solution: http://sonicskepsi.wordpress.com/2012/08/31/ipad3-♥-mixpre-d-♥-auria/


1

For a brand new kit, I would also suggest the Tascam DR100 MKii. These are great, not only because they have decent features for the price as well as XLR inputs, but they are one of the few handhelds around with a digital input. This means when you are wanting to upgrade you can get a SD USBPre or Mixpre-D and bypass the cheap converters and pre amps on ...


1

If just starting out I don't think you need to be jumping into spending so much on a recorder straight away, unless buying second hand. If you want brand new kit, I'd strongly recommend the following: Tascam DR100 MkII - Very decent portable recorder. Internal mics are great for the price you pay for the device too, as well as having XLR inputs. Rode NTG2 ...


1

Two things I regularly study nowadays are: How are sounds choices playing contextually to the story/moment? (big, small, brash, subtle, etc) How are "real" sounds cinematicaly cheated effectively? (Example: hot cars always sound like a slip-n-slide and it feels "right" on screen, but hardly ever do we hear a car in real life creating those kinds of skids ...


1

44.1 kHz sample rate should be fine but if you would like to do something like pitch shifting or time warp 96 kHz is strongly recommended. Your audio waves will have more detail in time. Same practice is applicable in bit depth. 24 bit is basic level. In Nuendo you should use 32 bit. I strongly suggest to open manual :] Steinberg explain theory very well ...


1

I agree with Andy Lewis on this one and feel that all of the elements are in the soundtrack are there to serve the story. With the elements in the soundtrack being dialog, sound effects, ambiance and score, one has to look at all of these things and how they tell the story, as well as how they work together to make everything complete i.e. the mix. Is the ...


1

All the things you mention are usually there to try and give an emotive response for the audience when viewing. Try to think why the sounds are being used instead of just how they are used too. Think of what the characters might be thinking/feeling at any given point any how the sound is reflecting this. This might make it easier to piece together the ...


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