3

Use ffmpeg If you want to mute the first channel and keep the second: ffmpeg -i INPUT -map_channel -1 -map_channel 0.0.1 OUTPUT


3

Do you mean you want to edit each file to increase it's volume, or you just want to play them all back at high volume? If the latter, just set the volume in your playback tool of choice to its maximum and play the entire list. If however you want to increase the volume of each file you can use Audacity's normalisation function: Go to File > Edit Chains ...


3

Maybe http://puredata.info/? Might be easier than javascript for doing complex stuff.


3

Give Matlab a go, there's quite a few resources out there to get you started but if you have programmed at all before you should be able to pick it up fairly easily, I've seen it used mainly in acoustics applications but I'm sure you could find another possibly more creative use.


2

www.cakewalk.com "Cakewalk Application Language (CAL) is an event-processing language based on C and LISP that you can use to extend Cakewalk products with custom editing commands. You can write your own CAL scripts, or use and edit CAL scripts that other people have written. You also can create CAL scripts by recording a series of commands, keystrokes, and ...


2

Such effects can be accomplished in javascript with the Web Audio API although the learning curve is steep.


2

Interesting question... I've not played around with it very much, but the Composers Desktop Project seems to be quite close to what you describe.


2

Use sox. If you are using Windows, then you can install MobaXterm on your computer. Then install the sox using: apt-get install sox. Invoking sox is very simple, just provide the start time and the duration to cut. For 2 minute chunk starting at 5m 32s you get: sox in.wav out.wav trim 5:32 2:00


1

You can use protools 'strip silence' feature. This will allow you to set working thresholds in order to 'cut' audio regions/clips based on the audio level of the content. Strip Silence allows you to either remove the audio, or remove the silence.


1

As leftaroundabout said, use ffmpeg (or avconv - the one is forked off the other). It is command line based, which makes it useful for batch operations. On my Linux box the batch command would be something similar to: for FILE in *.mp4 do ffmpeg -i $FILE $FILE.mp3 done Use the -c:a copy option if you just want to strip away video and use the audio codec as-...


1

A bit late to the party but your best bet would be to use the command line version. https://github.com/paulnasca/paulstretch_python


1

Reaper contains versatile batch processing capability: Wavosaur does batch processing with vst chain processing (it's free): Smack My Batch Up does the same thing with up to 5 chained plugins (also free). The author of Smack My Batch Up posted links to Mac versions here also.


1

Sound Forge Pro has a good, versatile batch converter with a VST effects chain. I've used it a few times myself, with good results.


1

as long as the files are lined up exactly into the same time position as the rendered file, you could easily use a quickkeys script to do this. just group the tracks, tab, b, repeat. IMO quickkeys is an invaluable addition to any daw for the macro looping capabilities.


1

As long as your files already contain the empty space at the tails to contain the decay of the effect and you are applying the same preset to each one, then you can use QuicKeys. I do technical pitch conversions (PAL conversions) this way. I can set it process files (sometime 40 or 50 5.1 tracks) with Pitch N Time Pro and walk away. I come back at the end ...


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