6

Just FIND sounds. They come from EVERYWHERE. Some are recorded outside, some in staircases, some are found in patches on synthesizers or even generated in FL Studio-like programs. You should get intimate with time-based FX like reverb and flange, competent with EQ, and experiment with things like pitch-shift, reverse, and time stretch. Be creative and ...


5

I think it helps to play with the mix of water layers subtly so that the sound is always evolving. Lighter sounds on top of the the more body or base sounds and changing the mix up a little bit. Adding some higher frequency and unique content like some splashes or drops will also help it. Since your working in surround you should have a little more room ...


5

Nice, a sound design question :) It's difficult to create a clear and not phasey ambience with water sounds, but in most cases it's a matter of less is more. How many different layers are you using and have you divided them up in 'tones' or 'colours'? A simple LF/MF/HF division can do a lot to keep things tidy.. and don't be afraid to use detailed trickles ...


4

First, you should have some field recordings to use as a reference, at least. Depending on the verisimilitude you are looking for, you might need to really hone in on the exact type of forest that is going to appear on screen. For example, a tropical rain forest is very different from a northern coniferous forest. If you take the wildlife out of the sounds ...


3

From my point of view, there are often very good results when you use the best of the both worlds = simple audio manipulation + synthesis. In your case ("dark-feeling game" as you mentioned), it might be fun to work with a sound that is usually considered to be very close to actual ambient music. A combination of some dark electronic soundscapes and layered ...


3

Funny that you ask this, I was just watching a recorded webinar with Randy Thom where he speaks about designing the waves in Castaway and specifically how he kept them from sounding too noisy. He said that not only did they do what Arnoud said with layering by frequency content, but also frequently used sounds produced by waves much smaller than the waves on-...


2

There are probably as many approaches to this as there are people doing sound design, there's no hard and fast rules, and finding your way is part of the 'art' of it, the thing that makes it yours rather than someone else's recipe, or worse, a cliche. First thing to do is get comfortable in some audio editing or sequencing software package. It doesnt which ...


2

Another option : use of the Web Audio API on the client side. That's basically two audio sources and one mixer.


2

I had a similar problem very recently. I'm currently working on an exploration video game with many waterfalls, rivers & streams. The platforms for the game include iPad and other tablets, so I wanted to avoid blasting out white noise, as this would not sound good on tablet speakers. I ended up recording waterfalls and fountains much smaller than the ...


1

What you are proposing cannot be done. Your only option is to use something like the 'dialogue isolate' feature of Izotope RX to isolate the dialogue in each of the files, then compare one result with the other to pick the best outcome. It is not possible to 'extract a pure version' of the dialogue because although the dialogue is 'similar', there is no ...


1

this is a perfect example of what I'm looking for .. https://soundcloud.com/matzo/jungle-sound-design all synth-based made on Serum .. now I have to figure out how he did lol


1

I remember a patch on the Roland D5 that had a nice jungle patch - it had a mix of sounds - jungle drums, crickets/frogs. I dont recall the patch number though! Outside of that I would suggest looking sound sources on the web. such as this one: https://www.freesound.org/people/spiid/sounds/344204/


1

Yes - you can do this. Various techniques would work, but in simplest terms: Create a single file from two audio files and serve this, either as a file or streaming. It really is that easy.


1

Try to use one mono or stereo source, panned there, where you want water source to be. Then, use surround reverb to add space. This how you can avoid phase cancellation, but its a trade-off: scene will not be so "large" and "wide". To compensate this you can use "wide" reverbs.


1

You should, beside recording and finding atmospheres, learn to use synthesisers. Espacially randomised noise filter and pitch stuff, combined with reverb delay and others, will create really futuristic soundscapes.


1

There's two large parts to this. Creating the actual sounds and implementing them in game. How you do each will effect the other. On the very high level, you can use what ever DAW you're comfortable with to create sounds. The setting of the game will drive what sort of sounds you'll want to be creating. On the implementing side, are you using middleware? ...


1

Watch Asian horror films. They are well-practiced at generating suspense with music and sound effects. Mostly it's minor key and discordant stuff. The sound designers who work on thrillers/suspense films use the same techniques such as filters, reverb, and pitch/time shifting that mentioned above to achieve a certain atmosphere. The kinds of sounds people ...


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