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Take a look at the bottom of the Channel Strip section. Here you will find a Format button that shows if the track is stereo or mono (there is a two-circle icon indicating it is stereo): or Click-hold the button and select either Left or Right channel: Additional details in the manual around page 264-265. Note that if you want to physically change the ...


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I use Audition on both PC and Mac. I find it fairly intuitive, although CoolEdit was the first editor I used so perhaps I'm a little biased here. I really like the spectral editing tools, and find the native noise reduction tools to be very capable. It's also good to have the multitrack option within the same package - I'd always use ProTools for anything ...


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There doesn't seem to be an already existing tool for your purpose. (At least, I couldn't find one). You might have to build your own tool in your language of choice. Some basic building blocks could be : Export your audio as unsigned 8 bits 8 kHz raw. Before exporting, apply a low-pass filter with a cut-off frequency below 2 kHz with a steep attenuation. ...


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Take a look at the command-line utility SoX. The 'trim' effect might be suitable for your use case.


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Nowadays it can be edited with programs like Tascam Hi-Res Editor: http://tascam.com/product/hi-res_editor/ From their site: TASCAM Hi-Res Editor is a new, free application that plays and edits up to 11MHz DSD or 384kHz WAV files. The software allows playback and export of DSD files without converting to PCM audio. This app is available now as a free ...


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This is a complex question =-) there's only one software that allows for true DSD editing, Sonoma Systems. This software however relies on sound card dependencies. DSD cannot be edited because there's only one bit, therefore it cannot be manipulated. At the point of edit Sonoma converts the audio to multi-bit DSD, and then goes back to 1bit after the edit. ...


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The difficulty with the problem presented is that "spectral content" is not just a number you can compare to find degrees of proximity. You need to have complex analysis algorithms, comparing multiple parameters depending on the intended application, and define proximity criteria, normally based on statistical methods. This is true even for relatively "...


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It doesn't matter about what is asymmetrical. Sometimes you can't rely on the Waveform alone. Looking at a Spectrum (see image, taken from an unspoken part), you can see that there are loud, bands of high frequency interference. The inteference is constant, and probably from a Fridge or electronic device. The frequencies are so loud that it may be best ...


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Sound Forge Mac Pro is servicable. If you can find it for cheap it might be worth it. Its still pretty buggy and lacking in features but it's quick to use if youre familiar with the flow.


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Reaper, hands down the most flexible editor and also with fully configurable scrub modes. Cross-platform is just the beginning of the benefits. www.reaper.fm Cheers.


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Triumph (formerly wave editor) has quickly become my goto 2 track editor. I work in game audio, so a lot of the design that I do is in logic A. because I'm quicker B. because I can't live without space designer. I then export separate pieces to build the sfx and make the necessary loops, cuts, trims and fades. They are incredibly responsive to support as I'...


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Probably apparent from my review that I use Sound Forge Pro 10 through Parallels desktop, which is quite stable if not slightly inconvenient when it comes to file paths. I recently grabbed Triumph but haven't had a chance to dig into it yet. I hear good things.


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I used to edit in soundforge, but the Sony incarnations became more and more buggy, so I moved on to using the DAW of choice. If I am Batch converting, I still fire up an old version of Soundforge on a PC (still sitting on XP) as it is stable and converts without fuss. As I migrated to MAC and away from cubase and soundforge (work didn't support them), i ...


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I use WaveEditor for Mac by Audiofile Engineering extensively for all kind of audio editing, be it from cutting recorded samples from my field recorder, mastering recordings for CD, converting between audio-formats or creating libraries for software-sampler. WaveEditor has been replaced by Triumph on Nov. 1. and I am curious myself if it brings the power of ...


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