2

I think what you're looking for is only to be found in CSI [city of your choice] not in real life. Izotope is about as good as it gets, but it needs a reasonably constant noise-floor to suppress. You could try a multi-band compressor to lift everything to the same level, but you'd be unlikely to be able to push the foreground conversation back far enough ...


1

Yes sortof maybe. Special plug ins can help a lot depending on the exact problem. The only correct thing to do is to get a better recording. Teach the speaker/vocalist how to use the mike to avoid breath sounds. Use a quiet room to avoid ancillary sounds. Noise reduction works quite well to remove hissy type noise but other sounds, NOT properly called ...


1

This is a good question. My workaround is to speed up the audio during my edit with Change Tempo. Since I'm editing interviews, I use a lot of labels, but then those labels are synced with the sped-up audio, which is a problem. So, I'll re-import the original, normal-speed track, change tempo on the sped up track with its Labels track sync-locked, and then ...


1

It's DC offset. Apply a DC filter or a high-pass filter to remove.


1

The trouble with Normalisation is it is undiscerning, it simply increases all gain until one peak reaches 0dBFS - & brings the entire noise-floor with it by the same amount. Adding compression is only going to make this worse, as it's limiting the peaks, allowing the noise floor to come up further. The simplest method is going to be to use the '...


1

Type the selection range in to the selection start and length input boxes in the lower part of the window. You can set a default length and just change the selection start value to cover the different ranges you wish to play back.


1

You can use protools 'strip silence' feature. This will allow you to set working thresholds in order to 'cut' audio regions/clips based on the audio level of the content. Strip Silence allows you to either remove the audio, or remove the silence.


1

Not sure if I got your question correctly. But if what you're trying to achive is the sole background music without the vocals why don't you just extract the vocals by cancellation as already described by you and afterwards cancel out the vocal from the original track with the vocal that you extracted? Due to the left over backgound noises and degradation ...


1

Without going into too much detail, the result you seek cannot be achieved in this way. The technique you are referring to is often used to recover "uncommon" information - you are seeking the reverse.


1

Protools has a "Split Silence" function which can be used to seperate out all elements where the audio level does not reach a particular threshold. Assuming that most of the audio is actually speech, then this is where I would start. Once you have all the speech segments, you can then 'shuffle' them down to a single region which you can then export. Yes, ...


1

Yes there is. It's called a crossfade and is a very basic part of audio editing technique. As a crossfade starts, you are playing two clips at the same time, however for the duration of the crossfade you are reducing the gain of one and increasing the gain of the other. At the point where the first clip is no longer audible, the second clip is at full gain....


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible