5

Better is subjective, and taste differs, but a chain of effects might include the following: High pass filter, maybe set at 20Hz. Depends on the material, but if you have a recording done with microphones the very lowest frequencies often are aeroplanes or lorrys or air condition and not the signal you want. When the signal is spoken word, go higher in ...


3

I assume that you export sound in order to import it somewhere else. This process has a lot of details and used to be done in the step called "mastering" in the old recording days. I'm no expert, but I could try to give you some pointers. Your first choice is whether to compress or not. The best known example of compressed formats is probably MP3. ...


2

You could try a high pass and low pass filter, and noise reduction. Then amplify the result if needed. For the high pass filter try a frequency of 400 Hz and for the low pass try 700 Hz. This gives you the segment of 400-700 Hz where your hooting signal seems to be. For noise reduction profile select a part where there is no hooting.


2

In the three clips you call out, the only effect I hear is a slight reverse reverb or pre-echo. In your audio editor, select the audio you want to process and reverse it so it plays backwards. Then apply a short reverb effect. Don’t go crazy here; a little goes a long way. Then re-reverse the audio so the reverb tails fade in before each word. It’ll ...


2

This is called crosstalk: the signal on the left channel leaks into the right channel. When you have 2 audio circuits (left and right) close together without being shielded, the electromagnetic fields produced by the circuits influence each other. This can happen anywhere in the analog signal path: in the sound card of your computer, or in the headphones ...


2

The process is identical, but one is tested, the other is not. Gain will not test for overs, it will just clip if you add too much. Normalisation will scan the entire track & only allow gain to be increased until the single loudest sample is at 0dBFS [or very slightly less if you want to avoid clipping on cheaper equipment. I've always used -0.3 as a '...


2

As of Audacity 2.3.0, I found that the High Pass filter changes phase of the audio (but the Equalization filter doesn't). This makes it not suitable for the case of mixing two tracks from the same source. So, for this purpose, I'd still use EQ with a 24 dB per octave slope to simulate a high-pass filter.


1

Changing the input volume can never do anything to reduce extraneous noise being picked up by the mic. If you turn it up or down, the noise will change by exactly the same amount as the signal. You need to either separate it first - by damping the source; at worst heavy curtains, at best double-thickness walls… or change the relative distances - get the mic ...


1

I don't know correct answer, but you can easily check it your self. Filter audio sample with HP filter Filter the same sample with FC EQ Phase invert one of the samples Sum samples (play them the same time) If result is silence - filters do the same thing. If there are some noises - algorithms of cutting not the same.


1

Cross fading as already mentioned. I just wanted to add that you can also manually do it. Create a second channel with the exact same settings as the channel you want to edit. Then copy the the part you want there. Make the part you want overlap with the part on the first channel and do the cross fading. That means start a fade out on the first channel on ...


1

You need to re-edit the sound and implement a very short fade-in and fade-out at the start and end of the sample.


1

Without seeing the waveform, the best guess is it could be DC Offset, or it could be a limitation of the audio engine. If a waveform is at any non-zero value when the sound is abruptly stopped, then the speakers are suddenly released back to zero with no smoothing. An audio app ought to be able to handle this itself in consumer applications, but if this isn'...


1

Investigate Ambisonics and Binaural sound. Audacity won't help you but you should investigate Reaper with the Ambisonic Toolkit.


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