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4

To be absolutely honest, I can't say that your thesis, as stated, sounds like a terribly interesting read. Analysis, particularly when it comes to mixing technique, can be rather difficult to make interesting. It's kind of like reading the verbal equivalent of a spreadsheet. However, if you find a way to give it a broader scope in terms of how your ...


3

Depends... If it's a track played by humans then unless they played to a click then it's unlikely the BPM is consistent because people will fluctuate tempo. Obviously the best will fluctuate only microscopically but fluctuate all the same. However it's electronic then the BPM is (likely) to be consistent. Therefore what happens isn't that it suddenly goes ...


3

It almost sounds like some gunshots or thunder, with short decays, layered in with the punch sounds.


3

Short answer to that is that it takes a lot more processing to split the frequency spectrum up into sections and then use triggers(or envelope followers) on the level of each section, than to simply use a single trigger on the output level. I would have thought there'd be some out there though. I've done a bit of 3D design on a personal level and I managed ...


3

Some of these are more relevant if you're regularly involved with a show and not so much if you're a contracted remote studio, but here goes: Consider the nature of the show and decide whether a round-table approach is better than one actor at a time. It presents greater technical problems but can lead to more natural dialogue and some great moments of ...


3

Mostly all anime sound design is done in Japan. I worked as a sound designer at a post house which dubs anime for english audiences. There were a lot of times that clients wanted me to "americanize" the japanese sfx to make them bigger and less cliche. However, the Japanese definitely have their own unique sonic style when it comes to this genre, and ...


2

I've done a lot of work in animation. As a rough guide I would say that a 12 minute episode (assuming a common delivery of 52x12 min episodes) that you would need 3 days tracklay and 1/2 day to mix. That's also presuming a fairly involved tracklay with little foley and most sounds from libraries. Make sure that you budget time to create all the delivery ...


2

Interesting topic. My first thought is to look at how visual cues is translated or amplified into audio - how the sound relates to the visuals to give them certain properties, and how that differs between animation and live-action. What aspects of the films differs from a "realistic" world, and how does it sound? You could also try to categorize different ...


1

The audience also has an opinion nowadays and the typical slapstick sounds stick out because of over usage. It depends on the scene/setting ofcourse. I've never used those type of sounds and always try to create something new for cartoonish SFX. It works just as well (or better) and keeps things interesting for me, the client and the audience.


1

I think you'll get the best results with a litle structure: First off, choose a specific work both of your own and of someone else's to compare. This limits the scope and offers a degree of focus that you won't find elsewhere. If you try to compare your general style to that of Chris Boyes then you're just going down a rabbit hole. Put your best work up ...


1

there is some stuff about the breakdown of the sounds for How To Train Your Dragon here, there is some really good sections where they show scenes broken down into stems, and sections with just the dragon vocals. Also it is a first grader friendly film :)


1

I'm going to come at this from a different angle. Since that's your list of potential films, I think you're severely limiting yourself as far as potential learning opportunities. Granted, there's a lot of interesting sound design in the modern blockbusters/action films you've compiled (Snow White being the only exception)...but there's a much larger world ...


1

Perhaps in the case of animations and live action it could be a valid point to figure out how much of the sound has been consciously "made" and how much of it either occurs in, naturally belongs to or is intuitively implied by the scenes. In live action you obviously have the possibility to use location sound as well as real points of reference (like life-...


1

Some additional things I'd be looking at are: Level of detail. How does it sound? eg. Does it just sound like a lever being pulled or is every little nuance of the sound audible? Level of layering. How much sound is going on. Can you just hear what is happening in the action right in front of you or is a whole world being created? Can you hear off screen ...


1

The only advice I can give is, you're going to be spending a LOT of time with the material - so pick something you are genuinely interested in and want to learn more about. I'd go as far as saying don't treat it like a piece of educational work - but treat it as an opportunity to research something you want to know more about, or to better your knowledge of ...


1

I think doing polls is the best (or most publicly useful) way to go with art dissertations in general. Another could be sales or viewing/listening charts, if it's something that's sold or distributed. Remember that what we do (or consume) is perceived subjectively. So in order to get somewhat objective/truthful or just informative statements about art that ...


1

The main thing to keep in mind when working with japanese animation is to keep it stylized. think of it more as a "score". you don't need to worry about the "photo-realism" of the shot, unless it specifically calls for it, of course. it doesn't matter if its foley, overused canned fx, synths, or traditional percussion; if it conveys the right emotion, it ...


1

I did a sound redesign for this anime-style music video (it's actually French animation so not technically anime). My observation was that to make it work it had to be somewhat more stylized than a typical western-style animation/video. My instinct was to emphasize specific moments on-screen rather than attempt to cover every little thing - I also ignored ...


1

While I like 6 days per half hour show (3 for FX, 1 for Dialog edit and 2 for Mix, assuming Dialog is already recorded), the simple truth is there are no established guidelines. The producers will probably have a certain time frame and budget to work with, and basically you'll need to decide whether or not you can do the gig inside those parameters. If you'...


1

I think it's the Soundworks vid for Where The Wild Things Are in which they show how they recorded the actors in the studio "physically" acting out the scenes with mics strapped to their heads, as opposed to the usual static VO/ADR type session. Well worth a look!


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