3

Depends... If it's a track played by humans then unless they played to a click then it's unlikely the BPM is consistent because people will fluctuate tempo. Obviously the best will fluctuate only microscopically but fluctuate all the same. However it's electronic then the BPM is (likely) to be consistent. Therefore what happens isn't that it suddenly goes ...


3

It almost sounds like some gunshots or thunder, with short decays, layered in with the punch sounds.


3

Short answer to that is that it takes a lot more processing to split the frequency spectrum up into sections and then use triggers(or envelope followers) on the level of each section, than to simply use a single trigger on the output level. I would have thought there'd be some out there though. I've done a bit of 3D design on a personal level and I managed ...


2

Interesting topic. My first thought is to look at how visual cues is translated or amplified into audio - how the sound relates to the visuals to give them certain properties, and how that differs between animation and live-action. What aspects of the films differs from a "realistic" world, and how does it sound? You could also try to categorize different ...


1

The audience also has an opinion nowadays and the typical slapstick sounds stick out because of over usage. It depends on the scene/setting ofcourse. I've never used those type of sounds and always try to create something new for cartoonish SFX. It works just as well (or better) and keeps things interesting for me, the client and the audience.


1

I think you'll get the best results with a litle structure: First off, choose a specific work both of your own and of someone else's to compare. This limits the scope and offers a degree of focus that you won't find elsewhere. If you try to compare your general style to that of Chris Boyes then you're just going down a rabbit hole. Put your best work up ...


1

there is some stuff about the breakdown of the sounds for How To Train Your Dragon here, there is some really good sections where they show scenes broken down into stems, and sections with just the dragon vocals. Also it is a first grader friendly film :)


1

I'm going to come at this from a different angle. Since that's your list of potential films, I think you're severely limiting yourself as far as potential learning opportunities. Granted, there's a lot of interesting sound design in the modern blockbusters/action films you've compiled (Snow White being the only exception)...but there's a much larger world ...


1

Perhaps in the case of animations and live action it could be a valid point to figure out how much of the sound has been consciously "made" and how much of it either occurs in, naturally belongs to or is intuitively implied by the scenes. In live action you obviously have the possibility to use location sound as well as real points of reference (like life-...


1

Some additional things I'd be looking at are: Level of detail. How does it sound? eg. Does it just sound like a lever being pulled or is every little nuance of the sound audible? Level of layering. How much sound is going on. Can you just hear what is happening in the action right in front of you or is a whole world being created? Can you hear off screen ...


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