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6

Both as a necessity when using projectors, and as to not risk distracting the actor. Mind you, voice-acting is MUCH harder for actors then regular physically based acting as all there is is a screen and a mic and nothing else. Dimming the room helps them, in my opinion (I too do a lot of voice-acting as well), to forget where they are to some degree and ...


5

Equalization will not affect pitch perception in any way. Your issue as you have correctly identified, is primarily one of direction, rather than being technical. You can use pitch manipulation tools but not to a massive extent as it will quickly become noticable. When directing these performances, try to ensure that there is a consistent level of energy ...


3

key things: large, super dead, super low noise floor recording space good quality shotgun and lav shotgun far enough away to match positioning on production good performance (louder than they think they need to speak, give them good context, headphone mix affects performance, sync needs to be dead-on)


3

I 100% agree with Tim. Let the stage make the decision. The ONLY EQ I ever (rarely) use in the edit is a 12-18dB/oct high pass rolloff at 80Hz on the Master if the production mixer left me with some nasty low end, but that's only if the low end is so bad that you can actually see the modulations and its making every single minute sub-frame edit snap ...


3

use the signal generator plug-in to create a one frame tone pop, duplicate it twice and place each one at 1/2/3 second intervals prior to the start of the line you are replacing...preferrably on a different track as well. note, your insertion point (recording start) should actually start at the "1" count. better to record silence than miss a syllable if the ...


3

Not to sound like a an old nag, but I'm not really sure its that productive (or perhaps fair) to single out particular instances of 'bad' ADR in film or TV. There are possibly many reasons why something doesn't sound like you expect it should (director/producer making the call, time/budget constraints etc etc) and I expect the person doing the mixing or ...


2

More often than not, the actor is watching a projected picture, so having a dark room helps with seeing the screen. If you are dubbing in a smaller room, and using a monitor, you can have more ambient light. At our studio we have both systems.


2

Distant perspective is one of the most difficult things to "fake" for dialogue, or for sound effects, that's why often, you need a real recording. If you really need to use what you got, try eq, like you said, and experiment with short delay times and some short reverb, with lo-pass filters on them. If you could worldilize it, it would propably be in this ...


2

Oh man, bad move on the sound recordists part and even worse move from the producer to use those sections! Obviously not your fault at all so I'd say explain the situation to the director/producer and let them decide what they want to do


2

Greg is right about the necessity of filling with crap from the production tracks and Foley. That's probably the #1 requirement for getting ADR to seem real. Varying the gain and EQ as the on screen actor moves about will help. Imagine what it would sound like if the actor were facing toward or away from a boom mic above the camera position, or something. ...


2

ADR matching is really about the performance. Its incredibly hard to make it match if the performance isn't right. There are analyzers you can find for free or come with your Daw to help you understand what your hearing frequency wise but EQ is really only part of the equation. From a technical standpoint Eq is important obviously but so is having some ...


1

What Joseph said. I think your best option would be to suggest playing the scene with music and no other sound, or maybe sound really low so only the loudest things pop through and it makes sense you can't hear the talking. Your next option would be to lip read or get someone who can lip read and have another actor overdub the lines. I was in a similar ...


1

Anything like what your planning to shoot is going to require foley or sound design but I can't think of anything that is ever cheaper in post. The cost to put someone up for a couple days is about a half day of work in the cheapest post houses, factor in the additional foley and sound design needed plus ADR, thats way more than a half day.


1

I do sound design and post and the truth is that, in this case, everything can be done afterwards. Still, during the struggle I imagine there will be gasps, grunts, or other human noises. If you want to capture those for sake of performance, you can focus on that. If you don't care about those, I believe you can save the money from location recording and use ...


1

You were hired as a sound recordist- not a miracle worker. This is a location problem and the scene shouldn't have been shot there unless they were willing to do ADR. The best you can do in these situations is radio mic everyone, cover up offending noises as best as possible (carpets and sound blankets) and get the best guide track possible. Unfortunately ...


1

Did you or the director tell the actors that the audio wouldn't be usable? If so, I wouldn't do that. Actors generally have enough to worry about and telling them things that don't really concern them will just pull them out of the experience. I'm not a production mixer, I only do post production but I do have lots of experience directing actors of all ...


1

it's always a very tricky situation when you have to work with unwanted reverb. I would say it's almost impossible to get rid of a serious reverb but to some extent it can be done using SPL De-Verb. You can download a demo here: https://www.plugin-alliance.com/en/downloads.html#spl_de-verb I think it costs 60USD or something like that and it can be very ...


1

We use 'add lines' to describe anything that was added in post. Walla is used to describe anything in the background. Before we have the script for the 'add' lines we refer to them as TBW's (to be written). That way we know which lines in our ADR list need to be addressed.


1

"Loop Group" is another possibility.


1

Well, there's ADR (additional/automated dialogue replacement) Wildtracks, buzz track. In the states you often hear the term 'walla' to describe crown muttering or bg chatter of any kind. slug usually means a short section of sound often silence


1

If I might... I think perhaps you're barking up the wrong tree (no pun intended). It's been my experience that "outdoor" ADR doesn't sound right, not because of the space, but because of the PERFORMANCE. Think about it... when you're outside, you're projecting over whatever ambience is there... birds, traffic, people... When you get into an ADR booth, you ...


1

Here is an option. http://www.boomlibrary.com/boomlibrary/products/outdoor-impulse-responses There are a few freeware/cheap IR reverb plugins out there that you could use to run these IRs. These impulses are really great for outdoors stuff.


1

If you decide to use a convolution reverb, you could try sending some backgrounds into the reverb as well so it naturally glues itself.


1

There's a balance between proper editing of the dialog tracks and proper use of the processing that Jay mentioned, but also the effects of masking when you introduce atmospheres, walla, foley, roomtones, and reverb/early reflections. For instance, even without EQ or compression, the acoustical variations, small amounts of background noise, level differences, ...


1

I agree with @Eric's comment on Shaun's answer, use loop record to do multiple takes in one go. But be sure to give the talent heads up first. :) When loop recording I like to have "Automatically Create New Playlists When Loop Recording" checked in the Preferences > Operation pane. Makes it super easy to cut together fragments of multiple takes.


1

Bad ADR: The Constant Gardener - during the 'advice' scene near the end when Ralph has a revealing conversation in the car at night. The driver is ADR'd over an OTS shot. Gangs of New York - after Leonardo wakes up in his bed of naked chicks (1/2 way through the film). Our butcher says a line with 'ignominious' during a reaction shot. The Bourne Identity - ...


1

WHITE COLLAR is quite bad too


1

I read in the Sound Effects Bible by Ric Viers that working in a darkened room increases your sensitivity to sound. It's quite likely that in a critical listening environment such as an ADR/Dubbing stage that there would be some benefit taking advantage of that phenomenon.


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