10

Well, it depends! The first important consideration: what style do you play / wish to record? For a classical performance, you need quite a different sound than for a folky dance tune, a jazzy improvisation or even a rock or metal lead role. The main part of the differences in sound is the room component. For a classical recording, you want a good-sounding ...


6

Basically yes. A solid foundation in maths and physics is essential. Acoustics is a vast subject within itself, and if you haven't got the basics sorted, you'll never progress to the more in depth stuff. A musical/technical knowledge base would be attractive to an employer, but really it's a science more than an art. edit However my friend is an acoustic ...


5

They missed out one vital piece of information - at what frequencies? They'd need to be made of lead to stop anything below 100Hz… I wonder whether their mosquito-repellant curtains work when they're open too ;-)


5

If you are using decent in-ears, then the genre really shouldn't matter. A decent set of in-ears will drop the noise level by about 20 to 30db and at that point any music played at a comfortable level should drown out the noise entirely (even if you are on a jet it should come close to drowning it out). If you are using ear-buds rather than in-ears I would ...


5

While I think that the question isn't really the exact cup of tea for this stack exchange, I will try to on the other answer. Assumption is that the noise in the cafe makes it difficult for you to work because of two factors: It has human conversation It has random but reasonably loud noises. Both these factors cause your brain to take notice of the ...


4

Is it cardinal to have background in math/physics/engineering in order to be able to work professionally in acoustics? It depends, because I've heard some sound technicians working on studio acoustics with good results. But I'm quite positive that even they've done some reading to do it properly. However, for something more complex than a small studio ...


4

The point of sound absorbing foams is that they a) have lots of air spaces and b) have angles that divert sound. The second part is relatively easy, but making sure to get consistent sound absorbing characteristics of the appropriate type of foam, along with the appropriate amount and size of air spaces and an acceptable level of durability does make it ...


4

Diffusers are meant to reflect and scatter incoming sounds, not to absorb them. Polystyrene is quite transparent to low frequencies, so the more rigid wood is the better material. A more precise comparison could be made by looking at the acoustic reflection coefficients of both materials for the frequencies of interest.


4

If it helps, there are a couple of tools you can use to measure room acoustics. REW https://www.roomeqwizard.com/ and Sonarworks reference https://www.sonarworks.com/reference. It's been quite a while since I used either of these tools however I do remember sonarworks' calibration test being the most thorough. The wizard makes things very simple also. It ...


3

The best shape for high frequencies (and some high mid) is the horn. But a horn can actually take many shapes. For example, its walls can be parallel like a didgeridoo. In fact, most, if not all, wind instruments are effectively differently tuned versions of the horn. The reason the exponential horn is often used in loudspeakers (and this is an ...


3

For recording violin, I tend to favor a small diaphragm condenser such as the Nuemann KM-184 as my 'go-to' choice. It doesn't have to be a Nuemann though ... the truth is that there are so many good choices in small-D mics out there that you can find a good sounding mic at almost any price point. I typically position the mic above the instrument by 12-16 ...


3

For vocal work, they (most music stores) have a product that wraps half-way around the mic. I have used them myself, and they work very well. They cost a bit, but are substantially cheaper than treating an entire room.


3

You need to ABSORB sound partly to reduce, and partly to keep it from bouncing around (which is why it sounds like a bathroom). So THICKER things like heavy curtains or moving blankets (or quilts) or even old mattresses propped up against the wall have been effective. If you MUST use egg cartons (which you already know are not very effective), then at least ...


3

Quite an interesting project indeed. The paper towel roll and cups are are working as an acoustic megaphone, also called (in ancient times) speaking trumpet. Directional focus of the radiating sound waves is part of the way the megaphone works, but that's not all, as, as you have noticed, there is also amplification in other directions, not just the front ...


3

By far most passive acoustic systems are linear and time invariant. As such, they don't create frequencies not present in the original signal. Passive systems that aren't linear are typically of the snaring/clacking variety. They either create overtones to existing frequencies, or they have their own strong resonance but are triggered by external signals. ...


3

Depending on how creative you want to get, the most effective sound absorption material I have found so far has been rockwool - which is the material often used for ceiling insulation. You can easily create wooden frames and place rockwool inside these frames as panels, covering them with hessian and stapling the hessian down to the wood, making easily ...


2

Everyone's favorite answer: It depends (mostly on price). As a generalization I believe it is safe to say that stand-alone components are (again generally) better than a micro / all-in-one system. Especially when it comes to replacing or repairing separate components have obvious advantages but one big disadvantage can be that if you buy components from ...


2

Acoustics is a deep subject, but here is a pretty good primer: http://ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html That said, a simple and excellent solution is to make absorption panels yourself. Make a frame from 1x4 inch wooden boards (fir, plywood, whatever). Cut a 4 inch sheet of mineralwool to fit inside the frame (or dimension the frame to take a whole sheet), ...


2

I don't think you can substitute a piano with our current technology. The main problem I see is that even with a fully weighted electronic keyboard the player would not have the same physical feedback, only part of it, and that would influence his playing to a great extent. For instance, the thump of the key reaching the keybed is not only sound but a very ...


2

More important is the isolation. I highly recommend using 3“ (or thicker) stone wool insulation completely covering the ceiling and walls on the inside. Cover it up with cloth so it's pretty, do not cover it with wood. 'Boxiness' comes from room modes which cause peaks and nulls at frequencies related to the distances between the surfaces. With proper ...


2

Let's use some simpler numbers to illustrate the problem. Let's say the smallest string on a piano is 1m, and has a frequency of 200hz (it's a piano for giants). And let's say the lowest note on a piano is 100hz (only one octave because our giants have a narrow hearing range). Given all other factors are consistent (tension, thickness, etc...), we know ...


2

Some monitors allow you to adjust the bass response for the purpose of corner placement and the like. But since you ask, I suppose yours don't have that feature. See this forum for flush/soffit mounted monitors, corner traps, ceiling clouds, Helmholtz resonators, etc. A lot to take in , but worth it. http://johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=12&sid=...


2

I don't know if this is exactly what you need, but in my experience I've obtained interesting results using IRs of several bodies, e.g. Altiverb's IRs have a really awesome "Design" section with IRs from a djembe, a dustbin, a flower pot and more.. This worked very well when I wanted to simulate something like a resonating body. Cheers, d


2

It's actually a complicated thing, how much space to put behind a driver. The air mass behind the driver actually affects how the driver moves. If you put the right volume of air behind the driver, you can even out the low end. If you put the right volume of air and the right size port, you can change the frequency response of the system (with a few ...


2

I've worked in a few large stages (<5000) people and I have never seen a stage filled with sand. The stage is usually an aluminum construction made of lite decks or even steel decks. This is usually preferred because they are versatile since you can move them around or even hire them out when you're not using them. They are used so often that they have ...


2

I don't know if there's an instrument that can measure this but you can calculate the RMS value of complex waveforms in many ways. It would include some maths so I would personally recommend using something like Scilab for the calculations From the wikipedia article on RMS (root mean square): ...the root mean square (abbreviated RMS or rms) is defined as ...


2

Sabin formula for Reverberation Time: You know the target RT and the volume of the room. What you are looking for is the total absorption A, S is just a surface area. Technically, the unit of A is called Sabine, not squared meters. So rearrange the equation and solve it:


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible