9

Well, it depends! The first important consideration: what style do you play / wish to record? For a classical performance, you need quite a different sound than for a folky dance tune, a jazzy improvisation or even a rock or metal lead role. The main part of the differences in sound is the room component. For a classical recording, you want a good-sounding ...


6

Basically yes. A solid foundation in maths and physics is essential. Acoustics is a vast subject within itself, and if you haven't got the basics sorted, you'll never progress to the more in depth stuff. A musical/technical knowledge base would be attractive to an employer, but really it's a science more than an art. edit However my friend is an acoustic ...


6

Remember that one of the biggest variables you have, is the performers on stage. They are not likely to sing or play at the same volume levels in practice as they are when performing. I personally don’t put much value in a sound check beyond verifying that all the equipment is working properly and the audio levels are at least somewhere in the ball park of ...


5

It's perhaps worth going into a bit more detail about the setup. From what you've said I presume it was a PA system and people speaking, right? In makeshift situations like these I think the important things are: Use a cardoid/hypercardoid mic. If it's a lectern situation miniature shotguns like the akg c474 are good for this sort of thing Get your speaker ...


5

While I think that the question isn't really the exact cup of tea for this stack exchange, I will try to on the other answer. Assumption is that the noise in the cafe makes it difficult for you to work because of two factors: It has human conversation It has random but reasonably loud noises. Both these factors cause your brain to take notice of the ...


5

If you are using decent in-ears, then the genre really shouldn't matter. A decent set of in-ears will drop the noise level by about 20 to 30db and at that point any music played at a comfortable level should drown out the noise entirely (even if you are on a jet it should come close to drowning it out). If you are using ear-buds rather than in-ears I would ...


5

They missed out one vital piece of information - at what frequencies? They'd need to be made of lead to stop anything below 100Hz… I wonder whether their mosquito-repellant curtains work when they're open too ;-)


4

Is it cardinal to have background in math/physics/engineering in order to be able to work professionally in acoustics? It depends, because I've heard some sound technicians working on studio acoustics with good results. But I'm quite positive that even they've done some reading to do it properly. However, for something more complex than a small studio ...


4

The point of sound absorbing foams is that they a) have lots of air spaces and b) have angles that divert sound. The second part is relatively easy, but making sure to get consistent sound absorbing characteristics of the appropriate type of foam, along with the appropriate amount and size of air spaces and an acceptable level of durability does make it ...


3

You should check out this site. He is very helpful but you must read his requirements for activity on his forum very carefully. http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php. Also this http://www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html Bass trapping is the main place to start. I wont explain bass trapping here as you could spend months studying it but I can tell you ...


3

Ideally you want to use a sound absorbing foam on the walls and ceiling - like this. You can buy panels already made, which will look better, but even just attaching foam like this to the wall will help deaden the sound. Use a carpet on the floor, and have thick curtains or rugs to hang over the windows. All these things will help absorb sound.


3

Make some tuned panel absorbers instead - the wedges wont tame it in my experience. Lots of cheaper options than buying that stuff, go DIY on your studio, you'll learn a bunch in the process of saving a sheckle or two and make for a better end result. FYI McGregor and I are talking about the same thing... http://www.protoolsprofessional.com/2010/03/14/...


3

I did a year of acoustical consulting (architectural / noise control) before going back the more creative sound design route. The first book my old boss had me read was M. David Egan's Architectural Acoustics. Very easy to read, with good practical principles and illustrations, also some cultural case studies. Obviously geared toward architectural use, ...


3

Sonic Experience: A Guide to Everyday Sounds by Jean-Francois Augoyard and Henri Torgue is an excellent book that explains many sonic experiences and acoustic phenomena by going into the philosophy, aesthetics, cultural context, and psychoacoustics of sound without going into too much detail about the physics or math.


3

For vocal work, they (most music stores) have a product that wraps half-way around the mic. I have used them myself, and they work very well. They cost a bit, but are substantially cheaper than treating an entire room.


3

how do we distinguish the sound as coming from front and behind? Good question. We don't. I'm often searching birds by sound in the field and I'm often confused with this. We often have quarrels with my girlfriend whether the bird was in front of us or behind :-) You have to turn your head to the side, little bit off the axis. That's also why some owls have ...


3

I believe that the pinna of the ear causes a frequency filtering effect as well, when the originating sound is behind the head. See this Wikipedia article. NCH Article. This fact is being used in hearing aid development and construction to improve localization results for wearers. One hearing device manufacturer that I'm aware of, Unitron, has even branded ...


3

You need to ABSORB sound partly to reduce, and partly to keep it from bouncing around (which is why it sounds like a bathroom). So THICKER things like heavy curtains or moving blankets (or quilts) or even old mattresses propped up against the wall have been effective. If you MUST use egg cartons (which you already know are not very effective), then at least ...


3

Quite an interesting project indeed. The paper towel roll and cups are are working as an acoustic megaphone, also called (in ancient times) speaking trumpet. Directional focus of the radiating sound waves is part of the way the megaphone works, but that's not all, as, as you have noticed, there is also amplification in other directions, not just the front ...


3

By far most passive acoustic systems are linear and time invariant. As such, they don't create frequencies not present in the original signal. Passive systems that aren't linear are typically of the snaring/clacking variety. They either create overtones to existing frequencies, or they have their own strong resonance but are triggered by external signals. ...


3

Depending on how creative you want to get, the most effective sound absorption material I have found so far has been rockwool - which is the material often used for ceiling insulation. You can easily create wooden frames and place rockwool inside these frames as panels, covering them with hessian and stapling the hessian down to the wood, making easily ...


2

Did You also treat the first reflection points? If not, I suggest to do it first and the measure again It can be quite tricky to optimize Your spot. It might take some time, So If You want to learn - got DIY If You have no time to dig into acoustics - go greenacoustics, real traps, GIK, etc. depends on the money really. Auralex might not work too well due ...


2

I agree with the previous posts. Go DIY! I like Auralex for the more architectural products which especially for diffusion. The foam products are petroleum based and much of the modern insulation products are very green. There are some many great forums and youtube videos that show you how to make absorption and bass traps with material from home depot ...


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