Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Questions that are generally related to sound recording techniques.

2
votes
There's no point in recording frequencies above 20 kHz unless you're going to do something with them, like put them through an effect that will modulate or stretch them back into the audible spectrum …
answered Aug 21 '10 by endolith
3
votes
noise a little bit. As for sampling frequency, I'd record at 88.2. It's not a matter of recording what humans can hear; 44.1 is plenty for that. Instead, it's a matter of avoiding aliasing. All … converters have some amount of aliasing. Recording at a higher sampling rate ensures that the aliasing stays way up in the ultrasound, and then you can get rid of the ultrasound with a really good digital …
answered Aug 14 '10 by endolith
1
vote
Lots of free (and terrible) recordings. There really needs to be some kind of quality control, rating system, etc. that actually works.
answered Aug 20 '10 by endolith
3
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Your 24-bit 48kHz uses the same oversampling sigma-delta modulation internally. Korg provides "AudioGate" software to convert 1-bit recordings to normal formats, which is what the 24-bit/96 kHz conve …
answered Mar 20 '10 by endolith
0
votes
This could be less conspicuous than a blimp? http://vimeo.com/4387137 http://www.redheadwindscreens.com/products/
answered Aug 1 '10 by endolith