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A microphone is a device that converts a physical vibration (such as sound) into an electrical signal, that can be stored and/or processed.

3
votes
different distances as well as different angles. (Creating a depth image is the power of an AB/ORTF.) Don't change the microphone placement. …
answered Mar 14 '11 by The Pellmeister
2
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I respectfully disagree with mic-ing the neck of the guitar in classical music, the fret sounds of a guitar are most likely considered disturbing. My personal favorite: create an XY-looking stereo pai …
answered Dec 10 '10 by The Pellmeister
2
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First, be careful with microphones that do not list certain specifications at all. Most of the time, if a microphone isn't accompanied with certain specifications, there is an obvious reason for it … . Have a look at sensitivity, a microphone that is not sensitive enough can get you into having to turn up the volume of your pre-amplifier to such a level that it introduces noise. Secondly, check the …
answered Dec 8 '10 by The Pellmeister
3
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The H4 comes with an XY-style stereo microphone system, which can be quite a thrill to record an acoustic guitar with, provided that the device is placed at the correct angle and distance. As a … . point the microphone end a bit more towards the bottom of the guitar. The XY microphones in the H4 are cardioid, that means they are less sensitive on the side than they are on the front. …
answered Mar 17 '11 by The Pellmeister
14
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It depends. On a lot of things, but mostly on the particular microphone. Phantom power in general is not evil for almost all dynamic mics who don't need it, but if you for instance plug a ribbon mic … in a phantom powered input without switching it off first, you might just destroy the microphone completely. You will most likely find the answer inside the documentation of your particular …
answered Dec 16 '10 by The Pellmeister
3
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It is a good idea to have a few dynamic mikes, (Shure SM-57 or SM-58, "Beta" models are a lot prettier in my opinion, but also a bit more expensive) My advice: don't save on these mics by buying cheap …
answered Dec 8 '10 by The Pellmeister
9
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While this is basically correct, and I know a few engineers that want to keep cable length as short and clean as possible, in my opinion the quality you lose by connecting two cables together (when go …
answered Dec 14 '10 by The Pellmeister
2
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Try replacing the SM57 with a large diaphragm condenser microphone (such as a Neumann U89 or TLM 173), and play around with placement, directionality and volume. (I normally move the amp + mic to a …
answered Mar 14 '11 by The Pellmeister
0
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be used at line level or as microphone signal. Edit: Microphones can have different sensitivities. A SM57 for example is known for needing quite a bit of gain on a regular preamp, so for getting a …
answered Mar 17 '11 by The Pellmeister