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Dayton Audio provides calibration measurements for some of their mics in the form of a text file mapping frequencies to gains for that particular mic (by serial number), e.g. one of mine is:

*1000Hz -41.0
    
20.00   0.0
20.55   0.0
21.11   -0.1
21.69   -0.1
22.29   -0.2
22.90   -0.2
23.53   -0.2
24.18   -0.3
24.84   -0.3
25.52   -0.3
26.22   -0.3
26.94   -0.3
27.68   -0.3
28.44   -0.3
29.22   -0.3
30.03   -0.3
30.85   -0.3
31.70   -0.3
32.57   -0.3
33.46   -0.3
34.38   -0.3
35.33   -0.2
36.30   -0.2
37.29   -0.2
38.32   -0.2
39.37   -0.2
40.45   -0.2
41.56   -0.2
42.70   -0.1
43.87   -0.1
45.08   -0.1
46.32   0.0
47.59   0.0
48.90   0.1
50.24   0.1
51.62   0.2
53.03   0.3
54.49   0.3
55.99   0.3
57.52   0.4
59.10   0.4
60.73   0.4
62.39   0.4
64.11   0.4
65.87   0.4
67.68   0.4
69.54   0.4
71.44   0.4
73.41   0.4
75.42   0.4
77.49   0.3
79.62   0.3
81.81   0.3
84.05   0.2
86.36   0.1
88.73   0.1
91.17   0.1
93.67   0.1
96.25   0.1
98.89   0.1
101.60  0.2
104.39  0.2
107.26  0.1
110.21  0.1
113.23  0.1
116.34  0.1
119.54  0.0
122.82  0.1
126.19  0.1
129.66  0.2
133.22  0.2
136.87  0.3
140.63  0.3
144.50  0.4
148.46  0.5
152.54  0.6
156.73  0.7
161.03  0.7
165.45  0.8
170.00  0.8
174.67  0.8
179.46  0.8
184.39  0.8
189.45  0.8
194.65  0.7
200.00  0.6
205.49  0.5
211.13  0.5
216.93  0.4
222.89  0.3
229.01  0.2
235.30  0.2
241.76  0.2
248.40  0.2
255.22  0.3
262.23  0.4
269.43  0.6
276.83  0.7
284.43  0.8
292.24  0.8
300.26  0.8
308.51  0.7
316.98  0.6
325.68  0.4
334.63  0.1
343.81  0.0
353.26  -0.1
362.96  0.0
372.92  0.0
383.16  0.1
393.68  0.1
404.49  0.1
415.60  0.1
427.01  0.2
438.74  0.2
450.79  0.2
463.17  0.3
475.88  0.3
488.95  0.3
502.38  0.3
516.17  0.1
530.35  0.0
544.91  0.1
559.87  0.2
575.25  0.3
591.04  0.3
607.27  0.3
623.95  0.3
641.08  0.3
658.68  0.3
676.77  0.3
695.35  0.3
714.45  0.3
734.07  0.3
754.22  0.3
774.94  0.3
796.21  0.3
818.08  0.2
840.54  0.2
863.62  0.1
887.34  0.1
911.70  0.1
936.74  0.1
962.46  0.0
988.89  0.0
1016.04 0.0
1043.94 -0.1
1072.61 -0.2
1102.06 -0.2
1132.33 -0.3
1163.42 -0.3
1195.37 -0.3
1228.19 -0.3
1261.91 -0.3
1296.57 -0.3
1332.17 -0.3
1368.75 -0.3
1406.34 -0.3
1444.95 -0.3
1484.63 -0.3
1525.40 -0.4
1567.28 -0.5
1610.32 -0.6
1654.54 -0.7
1699.97 -0.8
1746.65 -0.9
1794.61 -0.8
1843.89 -0.7
1894.53 -0.4
1946.55 -0.2
2000.00 0.0
2054.92 0.1
2111.35 0.3
2169.32 0.4
2228.89 0.4
2290.10 0.5
2352.98 0.5
2417.59 0.7
2483.98 0.9
2552.19 0.8
2622.27 0.7
2694.27 0.5
2768.26 0.4
2844.27 0.3
2922.37 0.3
3002.62 0.4
3085.07 0.5
3169.79 0.5
3256.83 0.7
3346.26 1.0
3438.14 1.5
3532.55 2.0
3629.56 2.3
3729.22 2.3
3831.62 1.9
3936.84 1.2
4044.94 0.4
4156.01 -0.2
4270.14 -0.5
4387.39 -0.3
4507.87 0.1
4631.65 0.4
4758.83 0.4
4889.51 0.3
5023.77 0.0
5161.72 -0.2
5303.46 -0.2
5449.09 0.0
5598.72 0.4
5752.46 0.6
5910.42 0.7
6072.72 0.7
6239.47 0.7
6410.80 0.9
6586.84 1.3
6767.71 1.8
6953.55 2.4
7144.49 2.9
7340.67 2.9
7542.24 2.6
7749.35 2.7
7962.14 3.3
8180.78 3.2
8405.42 2.6
8636.23 2.4
8873.37 3.1
9117.03 3.5
9367.38 3.0
9624.61 2.9
9888.89 3.6
10160.44    4.0
10439.44    3.7
10726.10    4.2
11020.63    5.0
11323.25    5.0
11634.18    4.4
11953.65    4.7
12281.89    4.9
12619.15    4.9
12965.66    5.1
13321.69    5.1
13687.50    5.1
14063.35    5.3
14449.52    5.4
14846.30    5.6
15253.97    5.3
15672.84    5.3
16103.21    5.4
16545.39    5.4
16999.72    6.3
17466.52    5.7
17946.14    6.1
18438.94    7.1
18945.26    7.6
19465.49    7.8
20000.00    7.5

I'm assuming the gains are dB (I don't know why they wouldn't be), but it's unclear to me if the values in the file describe the microphone's response, or if they describe the correction curve. That is, if it says 873.37 3.1, I'm not sure if I should apply a correction factor of +3.1dB vs. -3.1dB at that frequency, to the input signal from the mic.

Does anybody know? I can't really find any details on their site.

Also, as a side question, does anybody know what the reference level for the 1000Hz value that they give on the first line of the file is?

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  • 2
    Have you tried asking their support team at info@daytonaudio.com ?
    – audionuma
    Sep 22 at 5:59
  • @audionuma I did; and I literally just now got a reply, and I'm going to post it as an answer.
    – Jason C
    Sep 22 at 17:42
  • Why are we duplicating information from a proprietary company tech support service? If the company decides to update their technology or change something in the back end, then this immediately becomes obsolete. This isn't really the place for technical support questions.
    – Mark
    Sep 26 at 0:14
  • I’m voting to close this question because This is clearly a technical support question for dayton. Dayton are the reference holders of this information, consequently no need to duplicate this here.
    – Mark
    Sep 26 at 0:15
  • @Mark Well; it's not in any documentation on the site so it's not really searchable, so this does add value to the internet. Otoh I'm not familiar enough with this SE site to know if product-specific questions are on topic or not. (I do know that at least one non-Dayton product -- AudioTool on Android -- supports these files as well, if that means anything. I also know that lots of vendors provide mic calibration files in various forms and application of mic calibration curves is generally useful. Fwiw.) That's all I've got. 🤷‍♂️
    – Jason C
    Sep 26 at 1:10

1 Answer 1

2

Ok, I ended up also asking their tech support and the answer is:

  • The gains in the file represent the correction curve. That is: The values as given in the file, when applied to the input signal, yield the corrected signal.

  • The 1000Hz baseline level in the file is 1000hz response into 1kΩ relative to 0dBV = 1V/Pa (the design value, -40dbV for my mic, is listed on the product page). In my case it doesn't matter since I'm aligning gains on multiple mics myself with my own calibrator but it could be used to obtain absolute sound pressure levels if I didn't do my own calibrations.

Tech support response:

Within the calibration file if there is a negative that proceeds the offset value. (I.E. -2.3dB) then it would be a negative adjustment to bring the microphone in-line with the reference value at 1kHz. If there is no negative present prior to the offset figure it would be a positive adjustment. The calibration files are essentially a filter curve to an extent to align the microphone to a zero point.

Per the product page, (-40 dBV, re. 0 dB = 1V/Pa), thus the reference level would be -40dBV.

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    I wrote a node.js script to convert Dayton's files to Audacity filter curve presets, it's here if it's useful to anybody.
    – Jason C
    Sep 24 at 4:00

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