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I am setting up a home studio in an empty closet with a dynamic or condenser microphone. Recordings have some echo and I would like to reduce reverberation time by about 75% to be barely noticeable. The walls are hard and parallel, so wall treatment with absorbers is the way to go (from Home Studio Echo Problem). I would like to do it with between $50 and $100.

I am considering the following options:

  • covering surfaces with blankets, duvets, or comforters
  • covering surfaces with "acoustic geo textile" (literal translation from Portuguese, product here) with 5mm, 10mm or 20mm thickness
  • surrounding the microphone with a foam vocal booth, a cube with one side open for the actor's voice (product here)

Covering surfaces with acoustic foam tiles is not practical, as it would damage the walls and doors.

Which of these, alone or in combination and in which thickness, are most promising to reduce reverberation time?

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    Unless you first bring in a qualified acoustics expert (at far more than your total budget), everything you do is going to be guesswork. Best you can do is try some things & see which works best. If it really is 'closet-sized', first try coats ;) [I'm not actually joking, you already own them so they're in essence, free] – Tetsujin Nov 28 '20 at 16:58
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I'm just going to evaluate the options you mention.

covering surfaces with blankets, duvets, or comforters

Not really a professional option and can actually cause bad results

covering surfaces with "acoustic geo textile" (literal translation from Portuguese, product here) with 5mm, 10mm or 20mm thickness

You can't really do much with 20mm thickness... You'll need something like 10cm for velocity traps (porous absorbing materials)

surrounding the microphone with a foam vocal booth, a cube with one side open for the actor's voice (product here)

That can bear some positive results, also easy and cheap to test. The Actor must cover the entrance with his body or something. Also, this technique is very sensitive to how loud the Actor is and generally can get out of hand pretty quickly as well as the results of the recording can sound dull, muffled, and generally not nice :).

All the above have dramatic effects when using condenser mics and much less when using dynamic mics.

Check this answer here

If you can go for a good dynamic mic and you like the sound, it will help a lot. (something like a Shure sm7 for example)

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