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I have recorded 1 minute of almost silent in woods. there is mostly wind and grass moving sounds. Is there any way to extract wavelength ranges out of it? I only need to know the numbers. I don't want to separate them in audio format. Thanks

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Wavelength is the inverse of frequency (1/f) so all you need is to perform an FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) on your signal to get its spectrum (harmonic content). This can be done in many ways but from the way the question is formed ("Is there any way to extract wavelength ranges out of it? I only need to know the numbers."), I suspect Matlab or Scilab might be the right piece of software for you. Of course you can use an frequency analyzer in VST plugin form or similar but then the measurements would only be accessible visually, you wouldn't have a file with them.

This would give you the frequency distribution. I'm not sure what you mean by 'range' because this depends on the recording equipment, your hearing and even more - the threshold you set to decide if a frequency (wavelength) is there or not. I'm saying this because if you analyze noise (and there will always be some noise in any recording) you will find every frequency in it.

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