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Hi

I'm doing a sound design project on "the sound of home", and I'm stuck. The concept is based on (from an anthropologist perspective) the different classifications of what makes a home, and the paradoxes that these classifications spur. One of the classifications or dimensions of what makes a home is socialization, and the paradoxes derived from that are inclusion and exclusion.

So my question is: how do I make the sound of inclusion, and how do I make the sound of exclusion?

All suggestions are welcome. :-)

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    Could you expand on your terms "inclusion" and "exclusion"? Was Dave correct in his interpretation? Very interesting question. – Roger Middenway Oct 19 '10 at 13:32
  • Well... The interpretation of the terms can both be very abstract or very basic. So basically it can be anything. It depends on the broader concept. To elaborate on the sound design project: It is part of an art project called LOVEALLY in a small town near Aarhus in Denmark. :-) It is supposed to be a critique of the suburban way of leaving; keeping to one self, but always snooping around others business. So I wanted to focus on home, and six classifications of what makes a home. I wrote the question to get a brainstorm going, and it worked, so thanks. – Rune Oct 21 '10 at 19:14
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When I saw this post, I thought you were going to ask all of us to make atmos of our actual homes.

Inclusion: Closer sounds, and lots of things crossing the stereo field -- when I think of inclusion, I immediately picture myself playing with one toy or another with my son. Lego blocks would be the easiest because of their tell-tale sound. While playing, my wife, our dogs, and even my cat my cross our paths but the sound of the toys and my son would remain fairly constant.

Exclusion: Muffled sounds, as if through a closed door. Keep them distant, and never bring them closer. Possibly have the closest sound you hear be something that's self-gratifying, like a computer whir, to indicate this is a normal phenomenon. Again, in my own life, I noticed that after I built up the norm that I was going to spend the evening on the computer, I was left alone while I was back there.

Good luck, and welcome to the boards!

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  • Thank you for your answer. It was great to get some input to spark my creativity. – Rune Oct 21 '10 at 19:58
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Do your sounds need to be just of the space, or of the inhabitants?

Inclusion suggests, to me, shared experiences: The clatter of silverware in a shared meal, Dave playing with Legos with his child, the fwip-fwip sounds of a multi-player card game, even a fire in the hearth - I've certainly never built a fire at home without someone else around. If you're willing to consider the broader sense of "home," some cultures keep non-pet animals in the home as well. Any household ritual, from health-bolstering folk medicine to washing the dishes, could be used to suggest the inclusive bonds of the family and the home.

Exclusion might even be explored in terms of those isolated within the home compared to the outside world. Like Dave, to me it also suggests the sounds of machinery and technology that fills modern homes. Anthropological themes of familial order, patriarchy, and matriarchy could also be explored through the use of sound as well, but I don't know the balance of narrative vs. social-science your assignment requires.

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  • The sounds can be anything. It can be an abstraction of the paradoxes or something wery concret like playing with Lego. So basically it can be anything. It depends on the broader concept. To elaborate on the sound design project: It is part of an art project called LOVEALLY in a small town near Aarhus in Denmark. :-) It is supposed to be a critique of the suburban way of leaving; keeping to one self, and being were secluded. Including a small circle of people, and excluding others; the world.So I wanted to focus on home, and six classifications of what makes a home I love your blog by the way. – Rune Oct 21 '10 at 20:07
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Home could mean our solar system, place of residence, our fantasy, it all depends on the context whether you are in Iraq and there are machine guns everywhere or suburbia. Maybe at home you are always in a fantasy land or what if you have no home like a homeless person. Home is where the heart is.

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