0

How could I play back a library of background sounds with variably random volume and time in between repetitions?

I know I can manually create the same result with an MTE but I suspect there's software that will be able to achieve this goal.

Manually constructed MTE Example: Track 1: 60 minute base recording of light wind Track 2: 2 minute clip of a bird song played at a random interval between 5-15 minutes apart and at a random volume between -2dB and -15dB

Instead of constructing the above, I'd like to select tracks from a library, range of interval, and range of volume.

  • What is the DAW you are using? – JSmith Sep 8 '16 at 8:28
  • 1
    What is your end product? If it was Game Audio, I would say FMOD would be suited perfectly to this task. – Simon Bosley Sep 8 '16 at 12:41
  • What is an MTE? I looked up the term in freedictionary and wikipedia and I can't figure it out. – Phil Freihofner Sep 9 '16 at 7:01
  • MTE = multi-track editor. I have Adobe Audition but don't know if there are options better suited to meet these objectives. I don't have a specific application at the moment but I can think of several possibilities where this would be useful. So far the programmatic approach does make the most sense. – Dan Sep 9 '16 at 20:59
1

I'm doing exactly this with Java code that I have written. I'm using it to create soundscapes for games. As far as I know, FMOD (there is a free version, it is the sound library that comes with Unity) could also allow you to program this, as suggested in the comments above.

Really, I'd think that any programming language that can play back sounds should be able to do this. It is a relatively simple matter to use a Random function to come up with a range of volumes and timing intervals.

| improve this answer | |
0

You can do that by programming a synth such as reaktor. i don't have the recipe with me but check this result page you might find what you need.

| improve this answer | |
0

I'm just here to say that you can do all that using an amazing middleware called Wwise.

Logo below, as no-one mentioned it yet.

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.