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I truly cannot find interested people wanting sound design for their app. Ive kept up the posting on 15 different App development sites, 150 emails to iPhone developers (indie and commercial) and even probed around programmers resources to try and get in on the other side of App making, and still no collaborations have arose. I even started posting specifically stating services will be offered voluntarily and that didnt even help!

My reel is not bad at all, see for yourself - www.c3sound.com under Portfolio Tab

Are there any tips that anyone has up their sleeves that might make this process a bit easier?

Curtis

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When you cold-email or cold-call, you need to expect sometimes a return rate of 1% or less. If you've sent out just over 100 emails, you should expect maybe one person to possibly get back to you. You could consider me that "hit," since I hire sound designers for software projects, if you wanna argue statistics. :-p

Apps are the Hot Thing, but remember there are a LOT of other platforms out there...and that games aren't the only pieces of software that need sonifying. Heck, with HTML5, I'd argue that the opportunities for sonified software experiences are still increasing.

I gotta say that the best solution in my experience here is to network. Spend more time here and online, start a blog, take from and give back to the companies, communities, and groups you want to collaborate with, attend conferences...building personal connections will deliver a far higher percentage of potential job leads than reaching out cold (but there's still a place for that, too).

For games, check out IGDA as Dave suggested, but also GANG, for other practitioners in that field. Hit up the design agencies you'd want to work with: Think about if there are local shops that do rich-media flash work, that kind of thing. Attend meetings of groups of those people, be it the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference or local iOS coder's groups or the Broadcast Designers Association or the Interaction Designers Association or one of the several visual effects society. If there's a cocktail hour or a lecture for any such group, go! It's not all icky-gross schmoozing...it's about building relationships. If you meet someone from an influential shop or studio who's a total $&*#$#, then you probably would never want to do business, and lesson learned!

It's also important to not just show off your work, but that you're actually a Human that can communicate, laugh, and meaningfully collaborate smoothly with others. That matters more than raw talent in many, many cases.

  • Nathan's hit the nail on the head here, such an important aspect of this career. Check out tinysubversions.com/effective-networking for some great tips on networking in the games industry. – JTC Sep 24 '10 at 10:13
  • Hey Nate thanks for the advice -- Im on a movie right now headed to sundance in January -- I have some contacts at AAA studios workin' in as well. I just wanted something like this to do on the side. No problem with the networking etc, as my fingers are in multiple online pots/conferences already! I like your comment about being human haha. I know a couple robots that could use the advice! – C3Sound Sep 29 '10 at 13:27
  • You just put the needle on a VERY important record! – ChrisSound Oct 18 '11 at 18:46
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I know that Michael Taylor at www.stomp224.co.uk has worked on a few iPhone games, maybe try contacting him to see if he has anything to say on the issue. I'm not sure if he's active on this site.

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Get involved with your local game dev community. Check for a chapter of the IGDA, and if there are any indie game dev groups that meet near you -- I've picked up a bit of work from my local groups.

  • I started looking into a few indie game developer forums - lets see if I cant get in on a startup! – C3Sound Sep 29 '10 at 13:28

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