0

What effects are typically added to drums with regard to electronic music?

EQ is of course one and compression another. You could also add reverb or maybe even delay to a clap.

Are there more effects that are common?

closed as too broad by Travis Crum, Todd Wilcox, Rory Alsop Oct 12 '15 at 8:12

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1

When producing EDM drum tracks I like to use one particular plug-in called Bark Of Dog by Boz Digital Labs.

Bark of Dog is a bass resonance filter that lets you increase your low end without turning up the flab. Its a way to boost the low end while still keeping it under control. While the controls are super simple, there is a dial to select the frequency you want to boost, and there is also a mix dial that allows you to control how much you want to increase the amplitude of the selected frequency in the mix, the effect that this has on controlling the low end in a mix is pretty exciting. Perfect for drum and bass tracks in your mix. It gives your EDM track the sound and feel you would expect from a high-end pro-audio sound system in a nightclub. You can feel the difference in your track not just hear it. It can be used for your drum track, or you can do what I do and run it on your master bus track for a similar effect.

The great thing about this plug-in is the price......Its 100% free

But don't tell anybody...its my little secret.....

0

You mention the most common ones:

  • Equalization
  • Compression and limiting
  • Reverb
  • Delay

Other effects may include:

  • Modulation (Chorus, Flangers, Phasers etc)
  • Filters (sweeping EQs, resonance controllers etc.)
  • Distortion (in particular within industrial genres)
  • Expanders and gates (to tighten up samples)

And there are many others. However one important aspect to the sound is the fact that more often than not, the sounds are synthetically generated - i.e. they're not recordings of actual drums. Moreover the repetitive form with little variation also makes the beat even more trance inducing.

All these effects (and all those I didn't mention) really just scratches the surface of electronic drum mixing as a whole field. Much of the features you hear in a mix come come from meticulous tweaking of parameters and use of automations to control parameters.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.