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well... I have seen some threads about this subject. but they are pretty old. so i would like to hear some new advices.

I´m trying to build up the best "home studio" I can afford for editing, small projects, premixing, etc I have a dedicated room at home for my studio, I´m doing acoustical treatment and trying to fix up the thing I´m needing..

I have been studying about monitor speakers, but most information is about music. When talking about monitors for sound film, the professional references are about very high quality gear (too far from my posibilities) I would like to have a 5.1 system, but (with the money I have) I prefer to have the best LCR I can afford by the moment. Reading information in internet is confusing, more when we talk about monitors cause it depends in tastes in sound, perception, room acoustics...

anyway, I hve read a lot about Mackie hr624 (mk1 and mk2) they are in the focus. may it be the option?

equator d5 or d8

JBL LSR would be amazing, but it´s out of my range..

JBL LSR serie3 (305 and 308) very good reviews and owners comments... but I´m not sure if it is a good option for my goal

I would like to hear from you opinions and experiences about these monitors, other monitor recomendation, and any advice you should give to one who is starting by his own in this.

every comment will be welcome!! thanks in advance

closed as primarily opinion-based by Guney Ozsan, Todd Wilcox, Rory Alsop Jan 12 '16 at 14:44

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I would say learning how your monitors are lying to you and when they are telling the truth is more important than exactly what monitors you have. After that, having a second set that fills in the gaps of the main monitors and all it takes is practice and dedication to make quality mixes. – Todd Wilcox Sep 25 '15 at 19:52
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I haven't looked at the price range of the monitors you want, but I'm using a Focal Twins as my left and right and a Focal Solo as my center. You could definitely use Focal solo's as your LCR and Focal Alphas as your rear L and R. Just makes sure they are in the same general range.

Also, make sure you have an adequate controller for them all, I use an SPL Surround Monitor Controller.

  • Thanks for the advice. unfortunately, my budget is a little tighter for focal solo as LCR. I have no choice, I have to point a little low. :( – sprotnik Sep 25 '15 at 12:24
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If you are looking for good but budget studio nearfield monitors the KRK Rokit Series are a good start.

The JBL's are a good sounding monitor, but there has been some issues with the coating breaking down on some of their monitors of late, leaving a gooey / tacky residue which while not necessarily effecting their performance, is a real PITA to try to remove, which can effect the finish.

I have used the Rokit 5 inch (they do a 5, 6 & 8 inch) and they are pretty flat sounding, which is what you want from a nearfield monitor. Keep in mind that identical monitors can sound different in different rooms / evironments and this can have alot to do with the acoustic treatment, or lack of, in the room where your monitors are.

It's good advice to learn how your monitors sound in your room, once you know and understand how they sound its an advantage to your mixing.

It's also good advice, once you can afford to, to pick up a second set of monitors so you can A / B your mixes through these also, as well as listening to your mixes through different systems (e.g. the car cd player, phone / PC or laptop speakers / tablet) so you can see how your mix translates through different players.

The good thing about the Rokits, is that they do a 10 inch sub-woofer that you can add to your system later if you need to.

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