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We use full range JBL speakers (37Hz-20kHz) but we have also 2 extra JBL subs (37Hz-150Hz). Currently we use a high pass filter set at 150Hz on full range speakers and the rest goes to the subs. How do I utilize the low end of those full range speakers and get flat response in the room?

  • Why do you want to use all of the full range speakers? A "flat response" for the room is accomplished the same way it was when you did it the first time. – Micah Gafford Aug 3 '15 at 8:28
  • I should probably ditch those bass speakers. – owl Aug 3 '15 at 8:34
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    If you've already got a setup that has amps for your subs why would you toss them? I don't know why you would want to waste the power and send the signal to your full range instead. I understand in the grammatical sense your question I just can't understand why you want what you are asking. What am I missing? – Micah Gafford Aug 3 '15 at 11:35
  • Even though the nominal frequency response of your subs overlaps that of your mains, by using the subs you are giving yourself a lot more overall power bandwidth. Keep them and keep using them just as you are. – Todd Wilcox Aug 3 '15 at 11:44
  • Actually, you should low pass the subs at 150 also, and high pass them around 40, if you're not already doing that. – Todd Wilcox Aug 3 '15 at 11:49
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By utilizing the crossover, the mains can produce the mid and high frequencies much more efficiently, and thus louder and with less distortion. I cannot imagine an application where this would not be preferred. Using the individual eq on each channel on the mixer should achieve the desired result. For PA or speech, for instance, I dial the bass back, and boost the mids and highs.

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