1

It's great to create a perfect sound for one note using equalization, but then of course you lose some of the sound's best qualities once you change its pitch.

Is there a plug-in equalizer (preferably .vst, I'm using FL Studio) that can bring the prepared equalization in-line with the pitch?

I'm trying to explain this as best I can.

closed as too broad by Arnoud Traa Jul 16 '15 at 11:23

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • just heading in another direction here, but you could sample it (a few times if necessary) , then use a sampler to play the "perfect note" across the keyboard. – Marc W Jul 5 '15 at 3:41
  • Nice idea actually, if we're going for a 90s modulation feel. – Ducoodi Jul 5 '15 at 9:02
  • Hi! The question too broad, please try to explain what you are trying to achieve. – Arnoud Traa Jul 16 '15 at 11:24
  • Do I still need to? My question was answered correctly by rlee. – Ducoodi Jul 16 '15 at 13:12
1

There is: Surfer Eq by Sound Radix: http://www.soundradix.com/products/surfer-eq

EDIT: Just clarification on the plug-in: It bases the EQ curve on the fundamental pitch of the source material, so it will shift in response to changes in pitch. Meant mostly for instruments or tonal material (music) but also useful for sound design.

0

Highly recommend the ReaPlugs plugin set from Reaper. They are free and you can add them to your FL plugins. You will likely want to experiment with a muktiband compressor after the EQ so that you have a balanced sound overall after the pitch change in your signal chain. The ReaXcomp is pretty phenomenal. http://www.reaper.fm/reaplugs/#tour

0

Depending on the DAW this may be possible natively. I would recommend something along the lines of Bitwig (which is available for all major OS). It has a unified modulation system which allows you to do this to my understanding.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.