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I need to connect one XLR microphone to both my laptop to broadcast online, and to my hifi stereo system with speakers in multiple rooms (including the room with the mic).

I have tried connecting the mic directly to the laptop using an adapter:

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And playing back the sound through the laptop's output jack and into the hifi's aux input using another adapter:

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The laptop causes a slightly noticeable but very annoying delay in the output from the hifi stereo system.

I somehow need to split (or duplicate) the signal coming from the microphone and feed one end to the laptop and one end to the stereo system's aux input. What is the proper technique to do this?

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One solution is to get a 3.5mm splitter like any of the following.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/like/290547263693?limghlpsr=true&hlpv=2&ops=true&viphx=1&hlpht=true&lpid=107&chn=ps

http://www.officeworks.com.au/shop/officeworks/p/comsol-3-5mm-m-f-f-audio-splitter-co35mffsp

Thereafter, it's a case of running an extension cable to whichever device is furthest. The obvious problem is that this may introduce some form of delay/latency for one end resulting in a slight echo once more (I doubt it's going to be too much of a problem though). If it is, run extension cables to both your laptop and the hifi system of equal length. That should stop it.

If the signal from the microphone isn't strong enough to be split without signal degradation you may have to run it through a mixer and boost the gain through that.

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  • Isn't there some cheaper alternative to boost the microphone gain other than getting a mixer? – Hassaan Jun 21 '15 at 14:17
  • And won't there be any problems due to the signal being halved? – Hassaan Jun 21 '15 at 14:18
  • Run it through a spare stereo system, suitable audio interface, or similar device. Turning up the volume will effectively act as signal booster/gain option. This is optional though and is dependent on your desire a better signal. Shouldn't be too much of a problem honestly. The signal strength won't be halved, just slightly degraded. If there were, pure/passive headphone splitting devices would have no market and we would only be using active/powered options. – dtbnguyen Jun 21 '15 at 14:21
  • But this is the signal from the microphone we're talking about isn't it? The splitters you've linked to are for output signals. – Hassaan Jun 21 '15 at 14:26
  • Will still work as long as there is a signal and the signal type is correct. I mix output/input splitters/cables all the time without issues. Also note, cost of these are nominal and can be brought back to store if they aren't suitable for purpose. Ask first to make certain... – dtbnguyen Jun 21 '15 at 14:29

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