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I was on live show yesterday, hear this what i will try to explain. When singer talks to crowd or just sing quiet her voice, effect can be just barely heard. But when she raise voice volume effect what i'm talking about just start to fill in.

How to achieve this? I know that maybe to buy some "rack vocal processor" but i'm interest to recreate that with basic using: gate, delay, reverb..

When singer sings quite i want that my effect send channel is like turned 15%. When she raise volume i want to my send to be turned on 35%, something like that.. Is there some tool to do this.

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I generally call the tool I use for this "a sound guy". You can automate it though by doing some dynamics processing on the input to the effects unit. You need to use a device called an expander on the feed going to the effects unit (or have an effects unit that provides it's own expander).

An expander is a lot like a compressor, but the ratio goes in the other direction. Up until a certain threshold, the audio is normal, but then after the threshold is reached it goes up more quickly. Thus, the input level to effects would be low until the threshold is reached and then would rapidly increase after the threshold is reached.

You could do the same thing with a gate if you simply wanted it on and off, though that might result in some odd effects unless the gate can fade on and off. If you do go the gate route, you probably want a slow release time.

The end result is that the signal level in to the processor is low or off when there isn't much input but elevated/on when the threshold is exceeded. This can then be mixed back in at a static wet/dry level and you get a changing overall wetness since the input to the effects processing is increasing more than the dry level.

  • Hi AJ, thanks for info. I'll start with expander on send channel. You give me interesting point. – user12733 Jun 23 '14 at 16:42

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