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Would anybody like to share their experiences, tips, processes, etc from EQing with reverbs instead of using a parametric EQ?

  • ? ....ok, i'll admit it, i'm confused by this question. – Shaun Farley Aug 11 '10 at 1:30
  • I havn't tried it yet, and its hard to find the exact site but its in this general direction, 1-1-1-1.net/index_writing_whole.html . From what I understand, you are supposed to use short reflections to EQ a sound and it's mentioned on several different pages connected to that site. – Chris Aug 11 '10 at 4:56
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Occasionally I will use a convolution reverb instead of an EQ to affect a sound (very much like what Colin wrote earlier). Example: If I have a swish sound effect that I would like to make "thicker" or more bassy, I may turn to a plastic or wood IR instead of reaching for an EQ. Now, this may give me that thicker sound I'm looking for, but it may also significantly alter the sound altogether, which may or may not be desirable. Completely depends on your application.

Another way you can use a reverb in place of an EQ is to experiment with the damping controls (see Altiverb example below):

alt text http://www.profiaudio.hu/cikkek/kepek/03_2007_02_16_plugins/altiverb.jpg

Used in conjunction with a short decay IR (such as a metal plate, wood hit or glass tap), frequency damping can further alter your original sound by shortening or lengthening low, mid and high frequency reverb tails.

  • good answer birdhousesound, i only have IR-L and some lexicon reverbs that i won at a raffle, maybe one day ill be able to invest in an altiverb. – Chris Aug 11 '10 at 15:09
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Can you expand your question a little? I'm not quite sure what you mean.

EQing is a process (as I'm sure you know) that is used to fit a particular sound into it's proper sonic home (control frequency content as to not contend with other sounds in the same range), as well as to bring out nuances in a sound that you might want to bring to the front, or cover up ones you don't like.

Reverb is used to put a sound into a specific space, whether you are trying to put a sound into a specific space or location in a film, or you are adding depth to your music. It is also very useful when trying to make something sound much bigger.

(You most likely know all of this, I'm just trying to figure out your question)

Reverb does / can change the frequency content of a sound, but the two are not really interchangeable. There have been times, however, that I needed reverb on a sound that also needed a little EQing. I often throw up my reverb sends before I start fine tuning my EQs, and I've noticed a few times that the sonic quality / timbre of the reverb resolved my EQing woes without my having to turn a knob, but I've never really planned it that way on purpose. I've noticed this more with convolution reverbs than algorithmic units.

On a similar note, you can actually trick an IR into doing EQ or delay, or whatever other effect you put through it. So effectively, you can use a convolution reverb as an EQ, as long as you do the IR sample correctly. I've done that before with some vintage reverb and delay units that weren't mine. I sampled them into my IR plugin so I could play with them later. The only thing is that you're stuck with the settings of your sample. You can't change any of the settings later on. Fun to play with though, especially if a friend has a really cool piece of one-off or rare / expensive gear that they let you play with for a bit.

Now I have myself going off on a tangent. I'll stop now, but maybe you can clarify what you mean a little bit about your question so I have a better idea of how to answer?

Thanks!

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Considering the EQ controls on all my 'verb plugins only effects the reverb itself, the only way I can see this working is if you go 100% wet, at which point I think you've defeated the point.

I really think we're all just confused by your question.

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I havn't tried it yet, and its hard to find the exact site but its in this general direction www.1-1-1-1.net/index_writing_whole.html

From what I understand, you are supposed to use short reflections to EQ a sound and it's mentioned on several different pages connected to that site.

  • exactly what I said :-) – Utopia Aug 11 '10 at 6:04

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