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Suggestions on how to?

Yes, I know how to think in relation to what it is that I need and want to discuss and develop during the time of the production.

I'm specifically thinking about tools, how to deal with a multitude of data, sorting etc, while still being able to relate to the script and the scenes.

Turning it all into a database from the script itself manually is a big slow process that I wouldn't mind simplifying or following someone else's lead...

Any specific suggested tools?

Suggestions or comments?

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You can also look at the David Sonnenschein book Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema. The first 25 pages gives you a really good idea of what to look for and how to listen to your script and make notes.

Within the first 25 pages, Sonnenschien recommends that you take the script, whatever the version and read through it, mentally jotting down the sounds that you start to hear in your head.

Then, he recommends for a second read through that you start to pencil in ideas for ambience, environmental transitions, sounds for different objects, people and actions, identifying key words that will assist in clues for emotions and moments of physical and/or dramatic transitions. He also recommends sighting explicit sounds writing into the script such as a car horn, a school bell ringing etc. He also highlights the importance of noting phrases within the script that can generate potential sounds for dramatic effect and how to identify phrased clues for emotions.

After you have identified these sections, he recommends grouping all these "voices together" and to find the polar opposite of these words or phrases within these voices. After that is done, he suggests drawing visual maps based upon these thematic polarities and where they spike and dip within the narrative from the beginning to the end.

I really do recommend reading the entire book because within each chapter, he highlights the different elements that make up the sonic landscape and how you can put together a map for the on set and post production journey.

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I'd imagine something like (local) Peter Skarrats FMPro Script Supervisor database templates could be used or adapated (especially if the editor & script supervisor was using them too!)

http://peterskarratt.com/

  • Ok so this is me (ErikG) again. Im not friend with this new stackexchange format. It just refused to recognize me, so signing in via google, hopefully that will "stick". Thanks Tim, its a bit more complex and yet does not quite do what I want as far as looking at the templates go. And no the script handling on this show is old-fashioned, all analog with pen and paper forms, so it would be for just me, and that really doesnt make much sense to me. – ErikG Jan 29 '14 at 23:53
  • it is a good example of a workflow of importing a script into a database form - i dont imagine there is some magic easy way to do that – user49 Jan 30 '14 at 2:42
  • I don't need magical :), just not to darn complex, expensive and reasonably suited for what I had in mind. I mean any decent script writing program can identify scene descriptions, dialog etc and make a scene list from a simple text file based on the formatting. I would just somehow like to harness that strength into the way I would like it to work. Perhaps I'm wishing for Santa Claus... – ErikG Jan 30 '14 at 6:40
  • I just found that Adobe story might do what I need as it has a lot of customised export functions. But it looks like I need to sign up for the paid version. It's not to expensive as ling as I can cancel the monthly subscription whenever I want. I will look into that a bit more and report what I find. – ErikG Jan 31 '14 at 6:26
  • There is also another software called Lightspeed eps that has a bunch of sofisticated breakdown and export functions. – ErikG Jan 31 '14 at 6:27

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