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I have an mp3 player that has a headphone/speaker output socket of 3.5mm type. I want to use it to feed into a group of 4 speakers sets for PCs. The maximum cable distance should be around 8 meters long. I would like to be able to regulate the volume going into each speaker set (which will be in a different room) from a device connected directly to the player, and this devide then feeds the speakers.

So the questions are:

  1. What is this device that I'm looking for called, or group of devices for this kind of use to connect into a common player? (any recommendations as well?)
  2. What kind of cables will I use to bring the output to the speaker proximity with a female jack for the 3.5mm input?
  3. After what length will I need to use a repeater? (does this depend on the device that feeds the signals and cables it uses, or if it feeds into 3.5mm it is a standardized power output and therefore standard length) And any recommendations if I need one?

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In my experience most mp3 players have a very low output to begin with. For the cable distances you are talking about you will definitely need some sort of preamp to drive the speakers at any reasonable volume.

  1. As for distributing the signal to the different sets of speakers, you could simply get several headphone splitters, or possibly a headphone amp with multiple outputs which might eliminate the need for the preamp.
  2. You can get fairly long 3.5mm headphone extension cables and any adapters you may need for cheap online. I usually buy these types of items from MCM Electronics, but you can probably find other sources.
  3. This really depends on the quality of cables you have, the strength of the preamps you are using, and the input requirements of the speakers. I would recommend getting the cables first and experimenting around from there.

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