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I was looking for any posts on waves S360 and R360 used together for room emulation and couldn't find anything...

I'm using them on a feature right now and I'm really thrown off by some of the design in S360. The Room Size in the S360 has a minimum number of 1200. In the manual it states that this is a measurement of square meters, which would make that room roughly 3960 sq. ft. So even at a Distance setting of 1.5 meters, there seems to me to be large amounts of the early reflections mixed into the signal for say a bedroom where the source sound is 1.5 meters into the scene.

I like the R360, but the room size in that is just a number from 46 to 100. In the manual it doesn't state that it relates to any measurements.

Am I missing something? I'd like to model smaller rooms. Right now it's also working pretty well to balance echoey production with ADR the client could afford to do, but I feel like for that purpose it spreads the ADR to the left and right too much. Kind of wish there was a negative width setting, too.

I really liked the S360 when I first started using it, but I keep second guessing myself and turning down the distance more and more. It does sound pretty awesome even at a minimum setting though. It gives a sweet divergent spread that really makes the dialog pop

Do you use S360? and if so what do you feel works best? pointers?

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    I'd recommend a mono reverb, instead of Waves R360 for ADR matching. There's natural reverb/early reflections in the production tracks you're trying to match, so why not start there. The difference in width between production and ADR (even in smaller room sizes) is always going to be a dead giveaway. – Justin P May 20 '13 at 15:32
  • As far as ADR, yea that's solid. I was thinking about folding it down, but grabbing a verb with early reflections is going to be a much faster workflow... Still though for Mix, one of the coolest effects I've found with this S360 is automating the distance parameter for someone in a scene so their early reflections and spread change as they approach the camera from a distance. I'd like to be able to do something similar for hallways and bedrooms, but small distance changes sound dramatic and I believe it's because the room size is so large... – Rob Reider May 20 '13 at 23:50

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