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Does any one have any information on the types of mics that were used on film sets during the 60's and 70's? Here's a screen shot from Bergman's Persona...Anyone know what kind of mic this is?

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This web page may help you. The guy who made the page says you can contact him for any questions about vintage mics :) cheers http://www.vintage-microphones.de/index.html

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I agree with Utopia that it's an old AKG, although it looks like it's possibly attached to a Fisher Boom (JL Fisher), albeit an old one.

Fisher Boom http://www.howhill.com/allsorts/fisher.gif

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If I had to guess, I'd say it's some sort of old AKG mic. Looks a lot like a C12 but with extra grills at the tip.

That doesn't look like a mic they were using for booming. Looks just like they were using it as a close-up side-address announcer or VO mic. What is he doing in the pic?

As for mics in the 50s and 60s, as far as I know, they used Ribbons on sets for a long time.

But what do I know... I'm still a young'un.

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    Funny, I thought you were older!! ;-) – Si Charles Nov 25 '11 at 18:49
  • @utopia - In That scene they were showing the camera man. I agree that this mic probably wasn't used during the actual production. But I figured it may have given us some clues to the types that were used during that time. Dialog from this era sounds so clear and close mic'd. I know that a bunch of films were looped. Anyone have any other ideas? – JBerg Nov 25 '11 at 20:40
  • Well, I saw a documentary that showed how they used to hide mics in lamp shades and props around the set... I think in modern times we've erred away from those practical ideas that "a mic isn't always supposed to go on a boom". – Utopia Nov 25 '11 at 22:04
  • @SiAudio I wrote too much again... – Utopia Nov 25 '11 at 22:21
  • @Utopia, which documentary is that? – Marco Lopez Nov 26 '11 at 5:59
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I'm not sure, I would say ribbons and dynamics. Specially the AKG D12 in some point. Didn't The production mixer of "The Good German" or "Good Night Good Luck" used ribbon mics and plant mics to match the sound of the 50's, 60's?

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