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Trying Need help to understand the basic components of sound

I'm a software developer and I am trying to understand sound a bit better for a project I want to start working on.

Sorry if this is a bad place for this, if needed I can delete and repost elsewhere. Let me know.

Anyways, it is quite obvious to us when a flute plays a note compared to a piano playing that same note. What is making thenmakes them so different though? If I wanted to mathematically represent the exact sound a flute makes at a certain note, what are the values that I would need to record. Values such as frequency, volume, ectetc. I want to understand this because if we are able to reproduce these sounds on speakers we must have this data stored in our audio files.

All of the data mentioned above, how much does it vary depending on pitch and volume?

In basic what I want to understand is what all goes toconstitutes the soundssound that we hear. There is definitely a lot more I need to know, but I fear I don't know enough as it is with my current knowledge and I'll probably edit this question later.

Trying to understand sound

I'm a software developer and I am trying to understand sound a bit better for a project I want to start working on.

Sorry if this is a bad place for this, if needed I can delete and repost elsewhere. Let me know.

Anyways, it is quite obvious to us when a flute plays a note compared to a piano playing that same note. What is making then so different though? If I wanted to mathematically represent the exact sound a flute makes at a certain note, what are the values that I would need to record. Values such as frequency, volume, ect. I want to understand this because if we are able to reproduce these sounds on speakers we must have this data stored in our audio files.

All of the data mentioned above, how much does it vary depending on pitch and volume?

In basic what I want to understand is what all goes to the sounds that we hear. There is definitely a lot more I need to know, but I fear I don't know enough as it is with my current knowledge and I'll probably edit this question later.

Need help to understand the basic components of sound

I'm a software developer and I am trying to understand sound a bit better for a project I want to start working on.

Sorry if this is a bad place for this, if needed I can delete and repost elsewhere. Let me know.

Anyways, it is quite obvious to us when a flute plays a note compared to a piano playing that same note. What makes them so different though? If I wanted to mathematically represent the exact sound a flute makes at a certain note, what are the values that I would need to record. Values such as frequency, volume, etc. I want to understand this because if we are able to reproduce these sounds on speakers we must have this data stored in our audio files.

All of the data mentioned above, how much does it vary depending on pitch and volume?

In basic what I want to understand is what constitutes the sound that we hear. There is definitely a lot more I need to know, but I fear I don't know enough as it is with my current knowledge and I'll probably edit this question later.

1
source | link

Trying to understand sound

I'm a software developer and I am trying to understand sound a bit better for a project I want to start working on.

Sorry if this is a bad place for this, if needed I can delete and repost elsewhere. Let me know.

Anyways, it is quite obvious to us when a flute plays a note compared to a piano playing that same note. What is making then so different though? If I wanted to mathematically represent the exact sound a flute makes at a certain note, what are the values that I would need to record. Values such as frequency, volume, ect. I want to understand this because if we are able to reproduce these sounds on speakers we must have this data stored in our audio files.

All of the data mentioned above, how much does it vary depending on pitch and volume?

In basic what I want to understand is what all goes to the sounds that we hear. There is definitely a lot more I need to know, but I fear I don't know enough as it is with my current knowledge and I'll probably edit this question later.