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Complicated question when you understand it:

  • professional musicians normally test their music across a wide variety of setups prior to releasing to the public. That means they may have a variety of different pieces of hardware that they'll test prior to releasing to public. Obviously, you can replicate this is by testing with your own, your friends, and your family's sound gear, somehow gaining access to a sound studio, copying to your phone and then testing on a variety of hardware at your local electronics retailer, etc...
  • they'll also have 'reference/studio type gear' as well. This is gear that is basically designed to have 'little to no sound bias'. Namely, no bias (treble, bass, mid, etc...) in the way they re-produce sound. This means that once you create a 'master track' and produce it via this type of gear it will sound the same if someone down the line uses 'reference/studio type gear' as well (good example of this are ATH-M50X headphones which are often described as having a flat EQ curve/sound to them). It also means that the if people down the line have biased gear the 'relative distance' between your gear and their gear is likely to be smaller
  • another thing is that professional musicians also generally know how to produce/mix things better as has been stated by frcake. There are plenty of tips online about this but one thing I've noticed about them is that they have more experience, understand sound better, and they generally understand how their sound differs to others. A good example of this is their use of 'reference tracks'. If you can listen in and understand how the 'sound signature' differs from current sound and how you want to sound it will give you a easier time in doing what you want. How you achieve this is ultimately up to you whether by taking a course, studying from freely available online resources, purchasing music production magazines or books, listening to heaps of music, etc...

http://edmprod.com/50-tips-mixdowns/

https://www.subbassdj.com/blog/top-10-mixdown-tips-tutor-alex-grover

  • one more thing to note is that in some cases professional may have professional level gear as well. What I mean by this is that in some higher end sound studios they may have software which can take the sound signature (for instance, EQ curve) from one track and then apply it to another. Very useful to get a sonic signature applied to an arbitrary track and speeds up the process of production drastically as well. Can get a bit pricey depending on the solution you choose though

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/mastering-forum/644921-best-eq-cloning-replicating-spectrums.html

Complicated question when you understand it:

  • professional musicians normally test their music across a wide variety of setups prior to releasing to the public. That means they may have a variety of different pieces of hardware that they'll test prior to releasing to public. Obviously, you can replicate this is by testing with your own, your friends, and your family's sound gear, somehow gaining access to a sound studio, copying to your phone and then testing on a variety of hardware at your local electronics retailer, etc...
  • they'll also have 'reference/studio type gear' as well. This is gear that is basically designed to have 'little to no sound bias'. Namely, no bias (treble, bass, mid, etc...) in the way they re-produce sound. This means that once you create a 'master track' and produce it via this type of gear it will sound the same if someone down the line uses 'reference/studio type gear' as well (good example of this are ATH-M50X headphones which are often described as having a flat EQ curve/sound to them). It also means that the if people down the line have biased gear the 'relative distance' between your gear and their gear is likely to be smaller
  • another thing is that professional musicians also generally know how to produce/mix things better as has been stated by frcake. There are plenty of tips online about this but one thing I've noticed about them is that they have more experience, understand sound better, and they generally understand how their sound differs to others. A good example of this is their use of 'reference tracks'. If you can listen in and understand how the 'sound signature' differs from current sound and how you want to sound it will give you a easier time in doing what you want. How you achieve this is ultimately up to you whether by taking a course, studying from freely available online resources, purchasing music production magazines or books, listening to heaps of music, etc...

http://edmprod.com/50-tips-mixdowns/

https://www.subbassdj.com/blog/top-10-mixdown-tips-tutor-alex-grover

Complicated question when you understand it:

  • professional musicians normally test their music across a wide variety of setups prior to releasing to the public. That means they may have a variety of different pieces of hardware that they'll test prior to releasing to public. Obviously, you can replicate this is by testing with your own, your friends, and your family's sound gear, somehow gaining access to a sound studio, copying to your phone and then testing on a variety of hardware at your local electronics retailer, etc...
  • they'll also have 'reference/studio type gear' as well. This is gear that is basically designed to have 'little to no sound bias'. Namely, no bias (treble, bass, mid, etc...) in the way they re-produce sound. This means that once you create a 'master track' and produce it via this type of gear it will sound the same if someone down the line uses 'reference/studio type gear' as well (good example of this are ATH-M50X headphones which are often described as having a flat EQ curve/sound to them). It also means that the if people down the line have biased gear the 'relative distance' between your gear and their gear is likely to be smaller
  • another thing is that professional musicians also generally know how to produce/mix things better as has been stated by frcake. There are plenty of tips online about this but one thing I've noticed about them is that they have more experience, understand sound better, and they generally understand how their sound differs to others. A good example of this is their use of 'reference tracks'. If you can listen in and understand how the 'sound signature' differs from current sound and how you want to sound it will give you a easier time in doing what you want. How you achieve this is ultimately up to you whether by taking a course, studying from freely available online resources, purchasing music production magazines or books, listening to heaps of music, etc...

http://edmprod.com/50-tips-mixdowns/

https://www.subbassdj.com/blog/top-10-mixdown-tips-tutor-alex-grover

  • one more thing to note is that in some cases professional may have professional level gear as well. What I mean by this is that in some higher end sound studios they may have software which can take the sound signature (for instance, EQ curve) from one track and then apply it to another. Very useful to get a sonic signature applied to an arbitrary track and speeds up the process of production drastically as well. Can get a bit pricey depending on the solution you choose though

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/mastering-forum/644921-best-eq-cloning-replicating-spectrums.html

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Complicated question when you understand it:

  • professional musicians normally test their music across a wide variety of setups prior to releasing to the public. That means they may have a variety of different pieces of hardware that they'll test prior to releasing to public. Obviously, you can replicate this is by testing with your own, your friends, and your family's sound gear, somehow gaining access to a sound studio, copying to your phone and then testing on a variety of hardware at your local electronics retailer, etc...
  • they'll also have 'reference/studio type gear' as well. This is gear that is basically designed to have 'little to no sound bias'. Namely, no bias (treble, bass, mid, etc...) in the way they re-produce sound. This means that once you create a 'master track' and produce it via this type of gear it will sound the same if someone down the line uses 'reference/studio type gear' as well (good example of this are ATH-M50X headphones which are often described as having a flat EQ curve/sound to them). It also means that the if people down the line have biased gear the 'relative distance' between your gear and their gear is likely to be smaller
  • another thing is that professional musicians also generally know how to produce/mix things better as has been stated by frcake. There are plenty of tips online about this but one thing I've noticed about them is that they have more experience, understand sound better, and they generally understand how their sound differs to others. A good example of this is their use of 'reference tracks'. If you can listen in and understand how the 'sound signature' differs from current sound and how you want to sound it will give you a easier time in doing what you want. How you achieve this is ultimately up to you whether by taking a course, studying from freely available online resources, purchasing music production magazines or books, listening to heaps of music, etc...

http://edmprod.com/50-tips-mixdowns/

https://www.subbassdj.com/blog/top-10-mixdown-tips-tutor-alex-grover