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Hi there. It's true about not being taken seriously on a professionally-crewed (to some degree at least) multi-mic shoot with a Zoom, however it seems to me that people on this thread and site are not considering its use in that context anyway.

On the other hand, I've worked on shorts and corporate things where a Zoom was used, and (although I am stating the obvious here) the only issues for me were in the competencywork of the sound recordist / boom operator, as opposed to the Zoom's inherent qualities. In context, let's be honest, it's far worse to have bad coverage and badly miked dialog than anything audible in the Zoom's circuitry. In the end it is the quality of the recording decisions that ends up counting to the post audio person. However, SC Audio is right again - the Zoom is only a first step for an aspiring production recorder, and as soon as budget permits shouldwould mostly be relegated to a secondary / off-set recording role (plus there are some noise issues when combining some mics together with the Zoom, but these can mostly be worked around).  

Hi there. It's true about not being taken seriously on a professionally-crewed (to some degree at least) multi-mic shoot with a Zoom, however it seems to me that people on this thread and site are not considering its use in that context anyway.

On the other hand, I've worked on shorts and corporate things where a Zoom was used, and (although I am stating the obvious here) the only issues for me were the competency of the recordist / boom operator, as opposed to the Zoom's inherent qualities. In context, let's be honest, it's far worse to have bad coverage and badly miked dialog than anything audible in the Zoom's circuitry. However, SC Audio is right again - the Zoom is only a first step for an aspiring production recorder, and as soon as budget permits should be relegated to a secondary / off-set recording role.  

Hi there. It's true about not being taken seriously on a professionally-crewed (to some degree at least) multi-mic shoot with a Zoom, however it seems to me that people on this thread and site are not considering its use in that context anyway.

On the other hand, I've worked on shorts and corporate things where a Zoom was used, and (although I am stating the obvious here) the only issues for me were in the work of the sound recordist / boom operator, as opposed to the Zoom's inherent qualities. In context, let's be honest, it's far worse to have bad coverage and badly miked dialog than anything audible in the Zoom's circuitry. In the end it is the quality of the recording decisions that ends up counting to the post audio person. However, SC Audio is right again - the Zoom is a first step for an aspiring production recorder, and as soon as budget permits would mostly be relegated to a secondary / off-set recording role (plus there are some noise issues when combining some mics together with the Zoom, but these can mostly be worked around).

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source | link

Hi there. It's true about not being taken seriously on a professionally-crewed (to some degree at least) multi-mic shoot with a Zoom, however it seems to me that people on this thread and site are not considering its use in that context anyway.

On the other hand, I've worked on shorts and corporate things where a Zoom was used, and (although I am stating the obvious here) the only issues for me were the competency of the recordist / boom operator, as opposed to the Zoom's inherent qualities. In context, let's be honest, it's far worse to have bad coverage and badly miked dialog than anything audible in the Zoom's circuitry. However, SC Audio is right again - the Zoom is only a first step for an aspiring production recorder, and as soon as budget permits should be relegated to a secondary / off-set recording role.