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you and your team have finished a film. The producer emails you looking for a list of credits.

You had a small crew and a few people performed multiple jobs.

How do you want your credits to look on screen? how do you want them to look in imdb?

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5 Answers 5

I have a small film company here in Sweden and we often do these kinds of films with less than 10 people in the team. The directors always write their own scripts and produce the movies themselves, so we write in the credits:

  • Written, directed and produced by: Person

And I for example do both sound and music, and instead of writing every single aspect of sound work we simply write:

  • Sound and music: Olle Sjöström

And the directors always edit the films themselves but we give that a separate credit. So I guess that's how we do, don't know if it answers your question, but I hope so :)

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IMDB has a standard set of sound credit roles/titles, and you can enter multiple credits for the same project so thats fairly easy...

FWIW I dont personally agree with asking for a front credit, such things are given rather than taken/asked for... And if you are to be given a front credit or a card credit, it is usually stated in your contract...

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I always gun for any opening title credits I can get...and a few times they've obliged!

In the end credits, go for whatever you'd like and feel your team deserves. They don't cost the production anything to put up there - credits any more for the crew. Nobody in the theater cares who the 2nd unit assistant accountant was except for that person and their friends/family.

For IMDB, I'd go with 1 or 2 reasonable credits. If you ran a camera for a day, or AD'd because it was a slim crew, I wouldn't take a credit for something like that. Pick credits that will reinforce your current experience and career path. As other folks pointed out, you can edit IMDB. I routinely go through and purge out any oddball items to tighten up my credits.

Bottom line, don't sweat. As for something reasonable, and sort it out on IMDB later.

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Doesn't really bother me as long as I'm credited for what I do. A few jobs I haven't been credited at all (was an expenses only gig too..).

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I am never to worried about the credits in the actual film anymore. It is great to see your name up on the big (or small) screen but sadly I find no one sees them. Theaters are often empty by the time sound crew credits scroll by and broadcast television credits are routinely sped up to unreadable speeds or squished to the edge of the screen while a preview of another program plays at the same time.

IMDB is the important credit listing to me. I can Qc it myself and link to it on my website and in emails with clients. It is not perfect but at least people can actually read it when they are looking for the information.

If I complete multiple jobs on a project I normally allow a generic term for the on screen credit and them make the IMDB listing more specific to the individual tasks I worked on. So something like "Sound Editor" on the screen and then maybe three entries in IMDB with "Dialog Editor" "SFX Editor" and "ADR Recording Engineer" as a random example.

Low budget productions can complicate credits as all the jobs melt into one and there is no way to really credit every hat a person wears. I am not a fan of having several credits whip by in a row and the same name beside all of them. better to list all the tasks in one batch and then the name the one time.

Not sure if that is what you are asking but that's my two cents.

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