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How do you put a mic cable inside a rode boompole? I'm having a heck of a time. Do I have to cut the cable and resolder it after I put the cable in? If anybody has a diagram or something that'd be great. Maybe I'm just stupid.

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Not a big fan of cabling outside the pole. Its just too messy when changing positions on set or location. I have the biggest Rode pole and it sucks because the locks are imprecise and there is no facility to run a coiled cable up through the pole itself. If you can find a way, a coiled cable such as the K-Tek 9ft version sold at BH (search BH for K-18NN) its $45 cheap and will extend from 1.5ft to 9ft. As soon as I can I will be getting a different pole probably the Rycote because of the locks. –  user6812 Nov 14 '13 at 19:42

4 Answers 4

Generally I don't. It's faster to boom with it on the outside pulled tight. Gives you the option of different cable lengths and easier to maintain and pack up.

If you do want to, the way I found it to work was to take the top part off the Boom pole by unscrewing it. Tread the XLR cable through the black screw (top part of the pole you just took off). Then push your XLR cable down the pole to the bottom. Remove the rubber stopper in bottom and bring all your excess though the pole. Once you have the amount at the top you want to leave, align and push the copper mic thread adapter into the black screw that you removed and should have the cable thread though it from before. Then put the screw back onto the end of the pole carefully as it will tighten and also twist the cable on the inside of the pole. Finish it off by putting the rubber stopper on the bottom.

The biggest draw back of this, is that you need to tread your pole with cable when you adjust the length while in production. Really slows things down and if not properly done, can cause noise in your audio from the cable hitting the inside of the pole.

Seriously, unless you get a custom spring style cable for the inside of the pole, it really isn't worth the effort.

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I second what Bruce has said. Personally I think it's better to boom with the cable on the outside, I can coil the cable around the outside of the pole and get it tight so there is no cable noise at all. –  Si Charles May 30 '11 at 6:15
    
Yo tambien, moi aussi, and ditto. :-) –  NoiseJockey May 31 '11 at 5:19

I would suggest not wasting your time. It really is better to have the cable wrapped around the outside of the pole. You will need to alter the length a lot, and any coiling of cables is more prone to pick up interference as well as cause vibrations that can be be picked up by the mic.

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After reading a few articles and reviews about the Rode boompole it seems that the internal diameter is not quite large enough for a coiled cable. Also, as it's not designed to have a cable internally you will get a lot of noise from the cable banging about inside the pole. If you really want to put the cable internally then get some cloth tape and wrap the cable in this, this will help to reduce banging, but it won't stop it completely.

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If you want the "versatility" of an inside cable but the lightness of outside cable, you could tape the end of the cable to the top of the boompole and then put a short strap, like this

alt text

(loosly) on the end of the boom. This way the cable always sits and you can still adjust the length without it coiling and stuff. It's not optimal but it works for documentary and ENG and stuff...

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